The study of effects of pore architecture in chitosan scaffolds on the fluid flow pattern by Doppler OCT

Ying Yang, Andreea Iftimia, Jia Yali, Toby Gould, Alicia El Haj, Ruikang K. Wang

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Optimizing and fully understanding the dynamic culture conditions in tissue engineering could accelerate exploration of this new technique into a promising therapy in the medical field. Scaffolds used in tissue engineering usually are highly porous with various pore architecture depending on techniques that manufacture them. Perfusing culture fluid through a scaffold in a bioreactor has proven efficient in enhancing the exchange of nutrients and gas within cell-scaffold constructs. Upon perfusion, flowing fluid in pores inevitably produces shear stress on the wall of the pores, which will in turn induce cellular response for the cells possessing mechanotransducers. Thus, establishing a relationship between perfusion rate, fluid shear stress and pore architecture in a 3-dimensional cell culture environment is a challenging task faced by tissue engineers because the same inlet flow rate could induce local variation of flow rate within the pores. Until recently, there is no proper non-destructive monitoring technique available that is capable of measuring flow rate in opaque thick objects. In this study, chitosan scaffolds with altered pore architectures were manufactured by freeze-drying or porogen leaching out or alkaline gelation techniques. Doppler optical coherence tomography (DOCT) has been used to differentiate the flow rate pattern within scaffolds which have either elongating pore structure or homogeneous round pore structure. The structural and flow images have been obtained for the scaffolds. It is found that pore interconnectivity is critically important in obtaining a steady flow under a given inlet flow rate. In addition, different internal pore structures affect local flow rate pattern.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProgress in Biomedical Optics and Imaging - Proceedings of SPIE
Volume7566
DOIs
StatePublished - 2010
EventOptics in Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine IV - San Francisco, CA, United States
Duration: Jan 24 2010Jan 24 2010

Other

OtherOptics in Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine IV
CountryUnited States
CitySan Francisco, CA
Period1/24/101/24/10

Fingerprint

Chitosan
Tissue Engineering
Scaffolds
Flow patterns
fluid flow
Flow of fluids
flow distribution
Perfusion
Flow rate
porosity
Freeze Drying
Optical Coherence Tomography
Bioreactors
Pore structure
flow velocity
Inlet flow
Cell Culture Techniques
Gases
Scaffolds (biology)
Tissue engineering

Keywords

  • Chitosan porous scaffold
  • DOCT
  • Local fluid flow
  • Pore architecture
  • Shear stress
  • Tissue engineering

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Atomic and Molecular Physics, and Optics
  • Electronic, Optical and Magnetic Materials
  • Biomaterials
  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging

Cite this

Yang, Y., Iftimia, A., Yali, J., Gould, T., El Haj, A., & Wang, R. K. (2010). The study of effects of pore architecture in chitosan scaffolds on the fluid flow pattern by Doppler OCT. In Progress in Biomedical Optics and Imaging - Proceedings of SPIE (Vol. 7566). [75660J] https://doi.org/10.1117/12.842266

The study of effects of pore architecture in chitosan scaffolds on the fluid flow pattern by Doppler OCT. / Yang, Ying; Iftimia, Andreea; Yali, Jia; Gould, Toby; El Haj, Alicia; Wang, Ruikang K.

Progress in Biomedical Optics and Imaging - Proceedings of SPIE. Vol. 7566 2010. 75660J.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Yang, Y, Iftimia, A, Yali, J, Gould, T, El Haj, A & Wang, RK 2010, The study of effects of pore architecture in chitosan scaffolds on the fluid flow pattern by Doppler OCT. in Progress in Biomedical Optics and Imaging - Proceedings of SPIE. vol. 7566, 75660J, Optics in Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine IV, San Francisco, CA, United States, 1/24/10. https://doi.org/10.1117/12.842266
Yang Y, Iftimia A, Yali J, Gould T, El Haj A, Wang RK. The study of effects of pore architecture in chitosan scaffolds on the fluid flow pattern by Doppler OCT. In Progress in Biomedical Optics and Imaging - Proceedings of SPIE. Vol. 7566. 2010. 75660J https://doi.org/10.1117/12.842266
Yang, Ying ; Iftimia, Andreea ; Yali, Jia ; Gould, Toby ; El Haj, Alicia ; Wang, Ruikang K. / The study of effects of pore architecture in chitosan scaffolds on the fluid flow pattern by Doppler OCT. Progress in Biomedical Optics and Imaging - Proceedings of SPIE. Vol. 7566 2010.
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