The role of tumor ablation in bridging patients to liver transplantation

E. William Johnson, Peter S. Holck, Adam E. Levy, Matthew M. Yeh, Raymond S. Yeung, Robert R. Selby, Ryutan Hirose, Paul D. Hansen, John P. Roberts, Susan Orloff

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

25 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Hypothesis: Treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma before liver transplantation can curb local tumor progression and thereby prolong patients' transplantation eligibility. Design: Retrospective case-control pilot study. Twelve of 39 patients receiving liver transplantation for hepatocellular carcinoma had treatment before transplantation. Pretreatment included radiofrequency ablation (n = 8), percutaneous ethanol injection (n = 2), both modalities (n = 1), and tumor resection (n = 1). Twelve control subjects without pretreatment who were age-, sex-, and score-matched on the Model for End-stage Liver Disease and Child-Turcotte-Pugh classification were selected. The primary outcome measure was the waiting period for transplantation. Results: Patients with pretreatment waited on the transplant list significantly longer than their counterparts without pretreatment (median, 484 vs 253 days; P = .03). Conclusions: Treatment before transplantation with tumor ablation or resection is associated with a longer waiting period on the transplant list. This enables patients who might otherwise be removed from the list because of tumor progression to receive transplantation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)825-830
Number of pages6
JournalArchives of Surgery
Volume139
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2004
Externally publishedYes

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Liver Transplantation
Transplantation
Neoplasms
Hepatocellular Carcinoma
Transplants
End Stage Liver Disease
Case-Control Studies
Ethanol
Therapeutics
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Injections

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Cite this

Johnson, E. W., Holck, P. S., Levy, A. E., Yeh, M. M., Yeung, R. S., Selby, R. R., ... Orloff, S. (2004). The role of tumor ablation in bridging patients to liver transplantation. Archives of Surgery, 139(8), 825-830. https://doi.org/10.1001/archsurg.139.8.825

The role of tumor ablation in bridging patients to liver transplantation. / Johnson, E. William; Holck, Peter S.; Levy, Adam E.; Yeh, Matthew M.; Yeung, Raymond S.; Selby, Robert R.; Hirose, Ryutan; Hansen, Paul D.; Roberts, John P.; Orloff, Susan.

In: Archives of Surgery, Vol. 139, No. 8, 08.2004, p. 825-830.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Johnson, EW, Holck, PS, Levy, AE, Yeh, MM, Yeung, RS, Selby, RR, Hirose, R, Hansen, PD, Roberts, JP & Orloff, S 2004, 'The role of tumor ablation in bridging patients to liver transplantation', Archives of Surgery, vol. 139, no. 8, pp. 825-830. https://doi.org/10.1001/archsurg.139.8.825
Johnson EW, Holck PS, Levy AE, Yeh MM, Yeung RS, Selby RR et al. The role of tumor ablation in bridging patients to liver transplantation. Archives of Surgery. 2004 Aug;139(8):825-830. https://doi.org/10.1001/archsurg.139.8.825
Johnson, E. William ; Holck, Peter S. ; Levy, Adam E. ; Yeh, Matthew M. ; Yeung, Raymond S. ; Selby, Robert R. ; Hirose, Ryutan ; Hansen, Paul D. ; Roberts, John P. ; Orloff, Susan. / The role of tumor ablation in bridging patients to liver transplantation. In: Archives of Surgery. 2004 ; Vol. 139, No. 8. pp. 825-830.
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