The Role of Imaging in United States Courtrooms

Purvak Patel, Carolyn Cidis Meltzer, Helen S. Mayberg, Kay Levine

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

24 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The rapid evolution of brain imaging techniques has increasingly offered more detailed diagnostic and prognostic information about neurologic and psychiatric disorders and the structural and functional brain changes that may influence behavior. Coupled with these developments is the increasing use of neuroimages in courtrooms, where they are used as evidence in criminal cases to challenge a defendant's competency or culpability and in civil cases to establish physical injury or toxic exposure. Several controversies exist, including the admissibility of neuroimages in legal proceedings, the reliability of expert testimony, and the appropriateness of drawing conclusions in individual cases based on the findings of research uses of imaging technology. This article reviews and discusses the current state of these issues.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)557-567
Number of pages11
JournalNeuroimaging Clinics of North America
Volume17
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2007
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Poisons
Expert Testimony
Nervous System Diseases
Neuroimaging
Psychiatry
Technology
Wounds and Injuries
Brain
Research

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Patel, P., Meltzer, C. C., Mayberg, H. S., & Levine, K. (2007). The Role of Imaging in United States Courtrooms. Neuroimaging Clinics of North America, 17(4), 557-567. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.nic.2007.07.001

The Role of Imaging in United States Courtrooms. / Patel, Purvak; Meltzer, Carolyn Cidis; Mayberg, Helen S.; Levine, Kay.

In: Neuroimaging Clinics of North America, Vol. 17, No. 4, 01.11.2007, p. 557-567.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Patel, P, Meltzer, CC, Mayberg, HS & Levine, K 2007, 'The Role of Imaging in United States Courtrooms', Neuroimaging Clinics of North America, vol. 17, no. 4, pp. 557-567. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.nic.2007.07.001
Patel, Purvak ; Meltzer, Carolyn Cidis ; Mayberg, Helen S. ; Levine, Kay. / The Role of Imaging in United States Courtrooms. In: Neuroimaging Clinics of North America. 2007 ; Vol. 17, No. 4. pp. 557-567.
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