The role of IgE in the immune response to neoplasia: a review

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27 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The role of IgE in the immune response to neoplasia has received little attention despite suggestive evidence for an IgE response to tumor specific antigens. A complex relation exists between basophils, eosinophils, histamine, complement, and T cells. The latter cells are known to play a central role in the immune response to neoplasia and, in addition, are now considered important in the production and regulation of IgE, the molecule that may supply an important link between the pharmacologic and cellular dynamics of a successful anti tumor response. The evidence for an IgE role in the immune response to tumors, the relation between atopy and cancer, and the possible mechanisms whereby IgE could enhance tumor rejection are discussed in this review.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)11-20
Number of pages10
JournalCancer
Volume39
Issue number1
StatePublished - 1977
Externally publishedYes

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Immunoglobulin E
Neoplasms
Basophils
Neoplasm Antigens
Eosinophils
Histamine
T-Lymphocytes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cancer Research
  • Oncology

Cite this

The role of IgE in the immune response to neoplasia : a review. / Rosenbaum, James (Jim); Dwyer, J. M.

In: Cancer, Vol. 39, No. 1, 1977, p. 11-20.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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