The relationship of body weight to suicide risk among men and women: Results from the US National Health Interview Survey linked mortality file

Mark S. Kaplan, Bentson McFarland, Nathalie Huguet

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

45 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

There is recent, although limited, evidence that among men the risk of death from suicide is strongly inversely related to body weight. An unanswered question is whether the reported association between relative body weight and suicide holds for men and women equally. This study aimed to determine the effects of body mass index on suicide risk among men and women in the United States. We analyzed data from the combined 1986-1994 National Health Interview Surveys linked to the 1986-2002 Multiple Cause of Death file through the National Death Index. Survival analysis indicated that for each 5 kg/m increase in body mass index the risk of suicide decreased by 18% and 24%, for men and women, respectively. These findings may help us to better understand and prevent suicide. However, further research is needed to unpack the observed association between body weight and suicide risk into its component pathways and mechanisms.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)948-951
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of Nervous and Mental Disease
Volume195
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2007

Fingerprint

Health Surveys
Suicide
Body Weight
Interviews
Mortality
Body Mass Index
Survival Analysis
Cause of Death
Research

Keywords

  • BMI
  • Gender
  • Longitudinal
  • Population
  • Suicide

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

The relationship of body weight to suicide risk among men and women : Results from the US National Health Interview Survey linked mortality file. / Kaplan, Mark S.; McFarland, Bentson; Huguet, Nathalie.

In: Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease, Vol. 195, No. 11, 11.2007, p. 948-951.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{6b2cbb9e2a5e48c68669c437b4edd869,
title = "The relationship of body weight to suicide risk among men and women: Results from the US National Health Interview Survey linked mortality file",
abstract = "There is recent, although limited, evidence that among men the risk of death from suicide is strongly inversely related to body weight. An unanswered question is whether the reported association between relative body weight and suicide holds for men and women equally. This study aimed to determine the effects of body mass index on suicide risk among men and women in the United States. We analyzed data from the combined 1986-1994 National Health Interview Surveys linked to the 1986-2002 Multiple Cause of Death file through the National Death Index. Survival analysis indicated that for each 5 kg/m increase in body mass index the risk of suicide decreased by 18{\%} and 24{\%}, for men and women, respectively. These findings may help us to better understand and prevent suicide. However, further research is needed to unpack the observed association between body weight and suicide risk into its component pathways and mechanisms.",
keywords = "BMI, Gender, Longitudinal, Population, Suicide",
author = "Kaplan, {Mark S.} and Bentson McFarland and Nathalie Huguet",
year = "2007",
month = "11",
doi = "10.1097/NMD.0b013e3181594833",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "195",
pages = "948--951",
journal = "Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease",
issn = "0022-3018",
publisher = "Lippincott Williams and Wilkins",
number = "11",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - The relationship of body weight to suicide risk among men and women

T2 - Results from the US National Health Interview Survey linked mortality file

AU - Kaplan, Mark S.

AU - McFarland, Bentson

AU - Huguet, Nathalie

PY - 2007/11

Y1 - 2007/11

N2 - There is recent, although limited, evidence that among men the risk of death from suicide is strongly inversely related to body weight. An unanswered question is whether the reported association between relative body weight and suicide holds for men and women equally. This study aimed to determine the effects of body mass index on suicide risk among men and women in the United States. We analyzed data from the combined 1986-1994 National Health Interview Surveys linked to the 1986-2002 Multiple Cause of Death file through the National Death Index. Survival analysis indicated that for each 5 kg/m increase in body mass index the risk of suicide decreased by 18% and 24%, for men and women, respectively. These findings may help us to better understand and prevent suicide. However, further research is needed to unpack the observed association between body weight and suicide risk into its component pathways and mechanisms.

AB - There is recent, although limited, evidence that among men the risk of death from suicide is strongly inversely related to body weight. An unanswered question is whether the reported association between relative body weight and suicide holds for men and women equally. This study aimed to determine the effects of body mass index on suicide risk among men and women in the United States. We analyzed data from the combined 1986-1994 National Health Interview Surveys linked to the 1986-2002 Multiple Cause of Death file through the National Death Index. Survival analysis indicated that for each 5 kg/m increase in body mass index the risk of suicide decreased by 18% and 24%, for men and women, respectively. These findings may help us to better understand and prevent suicide. However, further research is needed to unpack the observed association between body weight and suicide risk into its component pathways and mechanisms.

KW - BMI

KW - Gender

KW - Longitudinal

KW - Population

KW - Suicide

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=36249018997&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=36249018997&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1097/NMD.0b013e3181594833

DO - 10.1097/NMD.0b013e3181594833

M3 - Article

C2 - 18000458

AN - SCOPUS:36249018997

VL - 195

SP - 948

EP - 951

JO - Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease

JF - Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease

SN - 0022-3018

IS - 11

ER -