The relationship between vehicle roof crush and head, neck and spine injury in rollover crashes

Konrad M. Dobbertin, Michael D. Freeman, William Lambert, Michael R. Lasarev, Sean Kohles

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background It is well established that rollover crashes are associated with a higher risk of serious injury and death than other types of crashes. Some of the most serious injuries that can result from a rollover crash are those to the head, neck and spine. The mechanism of injury to these body parts in a rollover is a matter of dispute in the literature. Some authors have concluded that the magnitude of vehicle roof deformation or vertical roof crush resulting from a rollover crash is not causally associated with head and neck injury severity, while others offer support for a causal association between roof crush and the degree of injury. A better understanding of the cause of serious injuries resulting from rollover crashes is important for improving injury prevention. Methods This study utilized data from the National Automotive Sampling System - Crashworthiness Data System (NASS-CDS) for the years 1997 through 2007. Both cross-sectional and matched case-control designs along with a new composite injury metric termed the Head, Neck and Spine New Injury Severity Score (HNS-NISS) were used to analyze these data. Results The cross-sectional analysis demonstrated a 64% (95% CI: 26-114%) increase in the odds of a life-threatening injury as estimated by the HNS-NISS with every 10 cm of increased roof crush. The results of the matched case-control analysis demonstrated a 44% (95% CI: 8-91%) increase in the odds of sustaining any injury to the head, neck or spine with every 10 cm increase in roof crush. Conclusion These results lend statistical support to a causal association between roof crush and head, neck and spine injury severity. Though they do not constitute definitive proof, they do contradict previously published theories suggesting that roof deformation is unrelated to such injuries.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)46-52
Number of pages7
JournalAccident Analysis and Prevention
Volume58
DOIs
StatePublished - 2013

Fingerprint

Neck Injuries
Roofs
Spine
Head
Wounds and Injuries
Neck
Injury Severity Score
Craniocerebral Trauma
death
cause
Crashworthiness
Dissent and Disputes
Human Body
Information Systems
Sampling
Cross-Sectional Studies
Composite materials

Keywords

  • Generalized estimating equation
  • Injury
  • Motor vehicle
  • NASS-CDS
  • Rollover crash
  • Roof crush

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Safety, Risk, Reliability and Quality
  • Human Factors and Ergonomics
  • Law
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

The relationship between vehicle roof crush and head, neck and spine injury in rollover crashes. / Dobbertin, Konrad M.; Freeman, Michael D.; Lambert, William; Lasarev, Michael R.; Kohles, Sean.

In: Accident Analysis and Prevention, Vol. 58, 2013, p. 46-52.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Dobbertin, Konrad M. ; Freeman, Michael D. ; Lambert, William ; Lasarev, Michael R. ; Kohles, Sean. / The relationship between vehicle roof crush and head, neck and spine injury in rollover crashes. In: Accident Analysis and Prevention. 2013 ; Vol. 58. pp. 46-52.
@article{1f76822b892940dba62b225a09eb3786,
title = "The relationship between vehicle roof crush and head, neck and spine injury in rollover crashes",
abstract = "Background It is well established that rollover crashes are associated with a higher risk of serious injury and death than other types of crashes. Some of the most serious injuries that can result from a rollover crash are those to the head, neck and spine. The mechanism of injury to these body parts in a rollover is a matter of dispute in the literature. Some authors have concluded that the magnitude of vehicle roof deformation or vertical roof crush resulting from a rollover crash is not causally associated with head and neck injury severity, while others offer support for a causal association between roof crush and the degree of injury. A better understanding of the cause of serious injuries resulting from rollover crashes is important for improving injury prevention. Methods This study utilized data from the National Automotive Sampling System - Crashworthiness Data System (NASS-CDS) for the years 1997 through 2007. Both cross-sectional and matched case-control designs along with a new composite injury metric termed the Head, Neck and Spine New Injury Severity Score (HNS-NISS) were used to analyze these data. Results The cross-sectional analysis demonstrated a 64{\%} (95{\%} CI: 26-114{\%}) increase in the odds of a life-threatening injury as estimated by the HNS-NISS with every 10 cm of increased roof crush. The results of the matched case-control analysis demonstrated a 44{\%} (95{\%} CI: 8-91{\%}) increase in the odds of sustaining any injury to the head, neck or spine with every 10 cm increase in roof crush. Conclusion These results lend statistical support to a causal association between roof crush and head, neck and spine injury severity. Though they do not constitute definitive proof, they do contradict previously published theories suggesting that roof deformation is unrelated to such injuries.",
keywords = "Generalized estimating equation, Injury, Motor vehicle, NASS-CDS, Rollover crash, Roof crush",
author = "Dobbertin, {Konrad M.} and Freeman, {Michael D.} and William Lambert and Lasarev, {Michael R.} and Sean Kohles",
year = "2013",
doi = "10.1016/j.aap.2013.04.020",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "58",
pages = "46--52",
journal = "Accident Analysis and Prevention",
issn = "0001-4575",
publisher = "Elsevier Limited",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - The relationship between vehicle roof crush and head, neck and spine injury in rollover crashes

AU - Dobbertin, Konrad M.

AU - Freeman, Michael D.

AU - Lambert, William

AU - Lasarev, Michael R.

AU - Kohles, Sean

PY - 2013

Y1 - 2013

N2 - Background It is well established that rollover crashes are associated with a higher risk of serious injury and death than other types of crashes. Some of the most serious injuries that can result from a rollover crash are those to the head, neck and spine. The mechanism of injury to these body parts in a rollover is a matter of dispute in the literature. Some authors have concluded that the magnitude of vehicle roof deformation or vertical roof crush resulting from a rollover crash is not causally associated with head and neck injury severity, while others offer support for a causal association between roof crush and the degree of injury. A better understanding of the cause of serious injuries resulting from rollover crashes is important for improving injury prevention. Methods This study utilized data from the National Automotive Sampling System - Crashworthiness Data System (NASS-CDS) for the years 1997 through 2007. Both cross-sectional and matched case-control designs along with a new composite injury metric termed the Head, Neck and Spine New Injury Severity Score (HNS-NISS) were used to analyze these data. Results The cross-sectional analysis demonstrated a 64% (95% CI: 26-114%) increase in the odds of a life-threatening injury as estimated by the HNS-NISS with every 10 cm of increased roof crush. The results of the matched case-control analysis demonstrated a 44% (95% CI: 8-91%) increase in the odds of sustaining any injury to the head, neck or spine with every 10 cm increase in roof crush. Conclusion These results lend statistical support to a causal association between roof crush and head, neck and spine injury severity. Though they do not constitute definitive proof, they do contradict previously published theories suggesting that roof deformation is unrelated to such injuries.

AB - Background It is well established that rollover crashes are associated with a higher risk of serious injury and death than other types of crashes. Some of the most serious injuries that can result from a rollover crash are those to the head, neck and spine. The mechanism of injury to these body parts in a rollover is a matter of dispute in the literature. Some authors have concluded that the magnitude of vehicle roof deformation or vertical roof crush resulting from a rollover crash is not causally associated with head and neck injury severity, while others offer support for a causal association between roof crush and the degree of injury. A better understanding of the cause of serious injuries resulting from rollover crashes is important for improving injury prevention. Methods This study utilized data from the National Automotive Sampling System - Crashworthiness Data System (NASS-CDS) for the years 1997 through 2007. Both cross-sectional and matched case-control designs along with a new composite injury metric termed the Head, Neck and Spine New Injury Severity Score (HNS-NISS) were used to analyze these data. Results The cross-sectional analysis demonstrated a 64% (95% CI: 26-114%) increase in the odds of a life-threatening injury as estimated by the HNS-NISS with every 10 cm of increased roof crush. The results of the matched case-control analysis demonstrated a 44% (95% CI: 8-91%) increase in the odds of sustaining any injury to the head, neck or spine with every 10 cm increase in roof crush. Conclusion These results lend statistical support to a causal association between roof crush and head, neck and spine injury severity. Though they do not constitute definitive proof, they do contradict previously published theories suggesting that roof deformation is unrelated to such injuries.

KW - Generalized estimating equation

KW - Injury

KW - Motor vehicle

KW - NASS-CDS

KW - Rollover crash

KW - Roof crush

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84877993341&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84877993341&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.aap.2013.04.020

DO - 10.1016/j.aap.2013.04.020

M3 - Article

C2 - 23689205

AN - SCOPUS:84877993341

VL - 58

SP - 46

EP - 52

JO - Accident Analysis and Prevention

JF - Accident Analysis and Prevention

SN - 0001-4575

ER -