The relation of red blood cell fatty acids with vascular stiffness, cardiac structure and left ventricular function: The Framingham Heart Study

Bernhard M. Kaess, William Harris, Sean Lacey, Martin G. Larson, Naomi M. Hamburg, Joseph A. Vita, Sander J. Robins, Emelia J. Benjamin, Gary F. Mitchell, Ramachandran S. Vasan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Polyunsaturated fatty acids have been associated with beneficial influences on cardiovascular health. However, the underlying mechanisms are not clear, and data on the relations of polyunsaturated fatty acids to subclinical disease measures such as vascular stiffness and cardiac function are sparse and inconclusive. In a large community-based cohort, we examined the relations of omega-3 and other fatty acids to a comprehensive panel of vascular function measures (assessing microvascular function and large artery stiffness), cardiac structure and left ventricular function. Red blood cell (RBC) membrane fatty acid composition, a measure of long-term fatty acid intake, was assessed in participants of the Framingham Offspring Study and Omni cohorts and related to tonometry-derived measures of vascular stiffness and to a panel of echocardiographic traits using partial correlations. Up to n=3055 individuals (56% women, mean age 66 years) were available for analyses. In age- and sex-adjusted models, higher RBC omega-3 content was moderately associated (p≤0.002) with several measures of vascular stiffness and function in a protective direction. However, after multivariable adjustment, only an association of higher RBC omega-3 content with lower carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (a measure of aortic stiffness) remained significant (r = -0.06, p=0.002). In secondary analyses, higher linoleic acid, the major nutritional omega-6 fatty acid, was associated with smaller left atrial size, even after multivariable adjustment (r = -0.064, p

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)5-13
Number of pages9
JournalVascular Medicine (United Kingdom)
Volume20
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 15 2015
Externally publishedYes

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Vascular Stiffness
Left Ventricular Function
Fatty Acids
Erythrocytes
Unsaturated Fatty Acids
Omega-6 Fatty Acids
Pulse Wave Analysis
Manometry
Omega-3 Fatty Acids
Linoleic Acid
Thigh
Blood Vessels
Cohort Studies
Arteries
Cell Membrane
Health

Keywords

  • aortic stiffness
  • fatty acids

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

The relation of red blood cell fatty acids with vascular stiffness, cardiac structure and left ventricular function : The Framingham Heart Study. / Kaess, Bernhard M.; Harris, William; Lacey, Sean; Larson, Martin G.; Hamburg, Naomi M.; Vita, Joseph A.; Robins, Sander J.; Benjamin, Emelia J.; Mitchell, Gary F.; Vasan, Ramachandran S.

In: Vascular Medicine (United Kingdom), Vol. 20, No. 1, 15.02.2015, p. 5-13.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kaess, BM, Harris, W, Lacey, S, Larson, MG, Hamburg, NM, Vita, JA, Robins, SJ, Benjamin, EJ, Mitchell, GF & Vasan, RS 2015, 'The relation of red blood cell fatty acids with vascular stiffness, cardiac structure and left ventricular function: The Framingham Heart Study', Vascular Medicine (United Kingdom), vol. 20, no. 1, pp. 5-13. https://doi.org/10.1177/1358863X14560808
Kaess, Bernhard M. ; Harris, William ; Lacey, Sean ; Larson, Martin G. ; Hamburg, Naomi M. ; Vita, Joseph A. ; Robins, Sander J. ; Benjamin, Emelia J. ; Mitchell, Gary F. ; Vasan, Ramachandran S. / The relation of red blood cell fatty acids with vascular stiffness, cardiac structure and left ventricular function : The Framingham Heart Study. In: Vascular Medicine (United Kingdom). 2015 ; Vol. 20, No. 1. pp. 5-13.
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