The procedural and interpretive skills that third-year medicine clerks should master - Views of medicine clerkship directors

Gregory J. Magarian, Dennis J. Mazur

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Scopus citations

Abstract

The authors surveyed medicine clerkship directors to determine which procedural and interpretive skills they felt third-year medical students should acquire. Of the 101 (81%) who responded, 91 felt that specific procedural and interpretive skills should be achieved by the end of the third-year medicine clerkship. Twenty-seven percent of these 91 reported having students keep a record of their activities; 35% reported testing students in the interpretation of various tests used in the evaluation of hospitalized patients on medicine services; and one clerkship director reported that his students were tested in their abilities to perform procedures. There was substantial disagreement by medicine clerkship directors over the procedural and test/study-interpretation skills in which medicine clerks should become proficient during the third-year medicine clerkship.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)469-471
Number of pages3
JournalJournal of general internal medicine
Volume6
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 1991

Keywords

  • grading
  • interpretation skills
  • medical education
  • medical student evaluation
  • medicine clerkship directors
  • medicine clerkships
  • procedure performance

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine

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