The prevalence of posttraumatic stress disorder and its clinical significance among Southeast Asian refugees

J. D. Kinzie, J. K. Boehnlein, P. K. Leung, L. J. Moore, C. Riley, D. Smith

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

246 Scopus citations

Abstract

All 322 patients at a psychiatric clinic for Indochinese refugees were surveyed to determine the presence of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). If PTSD was not diagnosed at the time of initial evaluation, a structured reinterview was performed. Seventy percent of the patients (N = 226) met the criteria for a current diagnosis of PTSD, and an additional 5% (N = 15) met the criteria for a past diagnosis. The Mein had the highest rate of PTSD (93%) and the Vietnamese the lowest (54%). Of the patients with PTSD who were enrolled in the clinic before March 1988, 46% (N = 87) were given a diagnosis of PTSD only after the reinterview. PTSD is a common disorder among Indochinese refugees, but the diagnosis is often difficult to make.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)913-917
Number of pages5
JournalAmerican Journal of Psychiatry
Volume147
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1990

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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