The prevalence of colonic neoplasia in patients with Barrett's esophagus: Prospective assessment in patients 50-80 years old

J. C. Poorman, David Lieberman, Andrew F. Ippoliti, Laura J. Weber, Wilfred M. Weinstein

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: An association between Barrett's esophagus and colorectal neoplasia has been suggested; however, several studies addressing this issue have reported conflicting results. The purpose of this study, therefore, was to determine the prevalence of colorectal neoplasia in a large group of patients (50-80 yr old; mean, 65 yr) with Barrett's esophagus and compare it with that of a similar group of asymptomatic, average-risk controls. Methods: Seventy-nine subjects (71 men, eight women) with well-documented Barrett's esophagus underwent complete colonoscopy (cecum reached), which was performed as part of an initial screening evaluation for enrollment in a prospective study of Barrett's esophagus. The control population (N = 930) is represented by the cumulative results of four recent studies in which screening colonoscopy was performed in asymptomatic subjects of average risk. The age of the two groups were similar. Results: A total of 38 adenomatous polyps were found in 26 patients in the study group. Three patients (4%) had polyps > 1 cm in size or with villous change, which was similar to the prevalence among asymptomatic controls (5%). The overall prevalence of colon adenomas was 32%, and the prevalence of colorectal cancer was 1% in the Barrett's group. In the control group, 30% had adenomas and 0.5% had cancer. Conclusion: The prevalence of adenomatous polyps, both large and small, in a group of patients (ages 50-80 yr) with well-documented Barrett's esophagus is no different from that in asymptomatic controls. These results do not support the assumption of an association between Barrett's esophagus and an increased risk of colon neoplasia, or justify an aggressive surveillance strategy for colon neoplasia in patients with Barrett's esophagus.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)592-596
Number of pages5
JournalAmerican Journal of Gastroenterology
Volume92
Issue number4
StatePublished - 1997

Fingerprint

Barrett Esophagus
Neoplasms
Adenomatous Polyps
Colon
Colonoscopy
Adenoma
Age Groups
Cecum
Polyps
Colorectal Neoplasms
Prospective Studies
Control Groups
Population

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Gastroenterology

Cite this

The prevalence of colonic neoplasia in patients with Barrett's esophagus : Prospective assessment in patients 50-80 years old. / Poorman, J. C.; Lieberman, David; Ippoliti, Andrew F.; Weber, Laura J.; Weinstein, Wilfred M.

In: American Journal of Gastroenterology, Vol. 92, No. 4, 1997, p. 592-596.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Poorman, J. C. ; Lieberman, David ; Ippoliti, Andrew F. ; Weber, Laura J. ; Weinstein, Wilfred M. / The prevalence of colonic neoplasia in patients with Barrett's esophagus : Prospective assessment in patients 50-80 years old. In: American Journal of Gastroenterology. 1997 ; Vol. 92, No. 4. pp. 592-596.
@article{c511b1b4d9a34ba99e629d4eeba7a723,
title = "The prevalence of colonic neoplasia in patients with Barrett's esophagus: Prospective assessment in patients 50-80 years old",
abstract = "Objective: An association between Barrett's esophagus and colorectal neoplasia has been suggested; however, several studies addressing this issue have reported conflicting results. The purpose of this study, therefore, was to determine the prevalence of colorectal neoplasia in a large group of patients (50-80 yr old; mean, 65 yr) with Barrett's esophagus and compare it with that of a similar group of asymptomatic, average-risk controls. Methods: Seventy-nine subjects (71 men, eight women) with well-documented Barrett's esophagus underwent complete colonoscopy (cecum reached), which was performed as part of an initial screening evaluation for enrollment in a prospective study of Barrett's esophagus. The control population (N = 930) is represented by the cumulative results of four recent studies in which screening colonoscopy was performed in asymptomatic subjects of average risk. The age of the two groups were similar. Results: A total of 38 adenomatous polyps were found in 26 patients in the study group. Three patients (4{\%}) had polyps > 1 cm in size or with villous change, which was similar to the prevalence among asymptomatic controls (5{\%}). The overall prevalence of colon adenomas was 32{\%}, and the prevalence of colorectal cancer was 1{\%} in the Barrett's group. In the control group, 30{\%} had adenomas and 0.5{\%} had cancer. Conclusion: The prevalence of adenomatous polyps, both large and small, in a group of patients (ages 50-80 yr) with well-documented Barrett's esophagus is no different from that in asymptomatic controls. These results do not support the assumption of an association between Barrett's esophagus and an increased risk of colon neoplasia, or justify an aggressive surveillance strategy for colon neoplasia in patients with Barrett's esophagus.",
author = "Poorman, {J. C.} and David Lieberman and Ippoliti, {Andrew F.} and Weber, {Laura J.} and Weinstein, {Wilfred M.}",
year = "1997",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "92",
pages = "592--596",
journal = "American Journal of Gastroenterology",
issn = "0002-9270",
publisher = "Nature Publishing Group",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - The prevalence of colonic neoplasia in patients with Barrett's esophagus

T2 - Prospective assessment in patients 50-80 years old

AU - Poorman, J. C.

AU - Lieberman, David

AU - Ippoliti, Andrew F.

AU - Weber, Laura J.

AU - Weinstein, Wilfred M.

PY - 1997

Y1 - 1997

N2 - Objective: An association between Barrett's esophagus and colorectal neoplasia has been suggested; however, several studies addressing this issue have reported conflicting results. The purpose of this study, therefore, was to determine the prevalence of colorectal neoplasia in a large group of patients (50-80 yr old; mean, 65 yr) with Barrett's esophagus and compare it with that of a similar group of asymptomatic, average-risk controls. Methods: Seventy-nine subjects (71 men, eight women) with well-documented Barrett's esophagus underwent complete colonoscopy (cecum reached), which was performed as part of an initial screening evaluation for enrollment in a prospective study of Barrett's esophagus. The control population (N = 930) is represented by the cumulative results of four recent studies in which screening colonoscopy was performed in asymptomatic subjects of average risk. The age of the two groups were similar. Results: A total of 38 adenomatous polyps were found in 26 patients in the study group. Three patients (4%) had polyps > 1 cm in size or with villous change, which was similar to the prevalence among asymptomatic controls (5%). The overall prevalence of colon adenomas was 32%, and the prevalence of colorectal cancer was 1% in the Barrett's group. In the control group, 30% had adenomas and 0.5% had cancer. Conclusion: The prevalence of adenomatous polyps, both large and small, in a group of patients (ages 50-80 yr) with well-documented Barrett's esophagus is no different from that in asymptomatic controls. These results do not support the assumption of an association between Barrett's esophagus and an increased risk of colon neoplasia, or justify an aggressive surveillance strategy for colon neoplasia in patients with Barrett's esophagus.

AB - Objective: An association between Barrett's esophagus and colorectal neoplasia has been suggested; however, several studies addressing this issue have reported conflicting results. The purpose of this study, therefore, was to determine the prevalence of colorectal neoplasia in a large group of patients (50-80 yr old; mean, 65 yr) with Barrett's esophagus and compare it with that of a similar group of asymptomatic, average-risk controls. Methods: Seventy-nine subjects (71 men, eight women) with well-documented Barrett's esophagus underwent complete colonoscopy (cecum reached), which was performed as part of an initial screening evaluation for enrollment in a prospective study of Barrett's esophagus. The control population (N = 930) is represented by the cumulative results of four recent studies in which screening colonoscopy was performed in asymptomatic subjects of average risk. The age of the two groups were similar. Results: A total of 38 adenomatous polyps were found in 26 patients in the study group. Three patients (4%) had polyps > 1 cm in size or with villous change, which was similar to the prevalence among asymptomatic controls (5%). The overall prevalence of colon adenomas was 32%, and the prevalence of colorectal cancer was 1% in the Barrett's group. In the control group, 30% had adenomas and 0.5% had cancer. Conclusion: The prevalence of adenomatous polyps, both large and small, in a group of patients (ages 50-80 yr) with well-documented Barrett's esophagus is no different from that in asymptomatic controls. These results do not support the assumption of an association between Barrett's esophagus and an increased risk of colon neoplasia, or justify an aggressive surveillance strategy for colon neoplasia in patients with Barrett's esophagus.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0030897845&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0030897845&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

C2 - 9128305

AN - SCOPUS:0030897845

VL - 92

SP - 592

EP - 596

JO - American Journal of Gastroenterology

JF - American Journal of Gastroenterology

SN - 0002-9270

IS - 4

ER -