The potential of ferumoxytol nanoparticle magnetic resonance imaging, perfusion, and angiography in central nervous system malignancy: A pilot study

Edward Neuwelt, Csanád G. Várallyay, Sándor Manninger, Diána Solymosi, Marianne Haluska, Matthew A. Hunt, Gary Nesbit, Alexander Stevens, Michael Jerosch-Herold, Paula M. Jacobs, John M. Hoffman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

115 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: Ferumoxytol, an iron oxide nanoparticle that targets phagocytic cells, can be used in magnetic resonance imaging of malignant brain tumors and can be administered as a bolus, allowing dynamic imaging. Our objectives were to determine the optimum time of delayed contrast enhancement of ferumoxytol, and to compare ferumoxytol and gadolinium contrast agents for magnetic resonance angiography and perfusion. METHODS: Twelve patients with malignant brain tumors underwent serial magnetic resonance imaging multiple times up to 72 hours after ferumoxytol injection at both 1.5 and 3-T. The enhancement time course was determined for ferumoxytol and compared with a baseline gadolinium scan. Perfusion, time-of-flight and dynamic magnetic resonance angiography and T1-weighted scans were compared for the two agents. RESULTS: The lesions were detectable at all field strengths, even with an intraoperative 0.15-T magnet. Maximal ferumoxytol enhancement intensity was at 24 to 28 hours after administration, and the enhancing volume subsequently expanded with time into a non-gadolinium-enhancing, high T2-weighted signal region of tumor-infiltrated brain. Dynamic studies were assessed with both agents, indicating early vascular leak with gadolinium but not with ferumoxytol. CONCLUSION: Our most important finding was that gadolinium leaks out of blood vessels early after injection, whereas ferumoxytol stays intravascular in the "early" phase, thereby increasing the accuracy of tumor perfusion assessment. As a magnetic resonance imaging contrast agent, ferumoxytol visualizes brain tumors at all field strengths evaluated, with delayed enhancement peaking at 24 to 28 hours after administration.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)601-611
Number of pages11
JournalNeurosurgery
Volume60
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2007

Fingerprint

Ferrosoferric Oxide
Magnetic Resonance Angiography
Nanoparticles
Central Nervous System
Perfusion
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Gadolinium
Brain Neoplasms
Neoplasms
Contrast Media
Blood Vessels
Injections
Magnets
Phagocytes

Keywords

  • Brain tumor
  • Contrast agent
  • Ferumoxytol
  • Magnetic resonance angiography
  • Magnetic resonance imaging
  • Magnetic resonance perfusion
  • Ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Surgery

Cite this

The potential of ferumoxytol nanoparticle magnetic resonance imaging, perfusion, and angiography in central nervous system malignancy : A pilot study. / Neuwelt, Edward; Várallyay, Csanád G.; Manninger, Sándor; Solymosi, Diána; Haluska, Marianne; Hunt, Matthew A.; Nesbit, Gary; Stevens, Alexander; Jerosch-Herold, Michael; Jacobs, Paula M.; Hoffman, John M.

In: Neurosurgery, Vol. 60, No. 4, 04.2007, p. 601-611.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Neuwelt, E, Várallyay, CG, Manninger, S, Solymosi, D, Haluska, M, Hunt, MA, Nesbit, G, Stevens, A, Jerosch-Herold, M, Jacobs, PM & Hoffman, JM 2007, 'The potential of ferumoxytol nanoparticle magnetic resonance imaging, perfusion, and angiography in central nervous system malignancy: A pilot study', Neurosurgery, vol. 60, no. 4, pp. 601-611. https://doi.org/10.1227/01.NEU.0000255350.71700.37
Neuwelt, Edward ; Várallyay, Csanád G. ; Manninger, Sándor ; Solymosi, Diána ; Haluska, Marianne ; Hunt, Matthew A. ; Nesbit, Gary ; Stevens, Alexander ; Jerosch-Herold, Michael ; Jacobs, Paula M. ; Hoffman, John M. / The potential of ferumoxytol nanoparticle magnetic resonance imaging, perfusion, and angiography in central nervous system malignancy : A pilot study. In: Neurosurgery. 2007 ; Vol. 60, No. 4. pp. 601-611.
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T2 - A pilot study

AU - Neuwelt, Edward

AU - Várallyay, Csanád G.

AU - Manninger, Sándor

AU - Solymosi, Diána

AU - Haluska, Marianne

AU - Hunt, Matthew A.

AU - Nesbit, Gary

AU - Stevens, Alexander

AU - Jerosch-Herold, Michael

AU - Jacobs, Paula M.

AU - Hoffman, John M.

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N2 - OBJECTIVE: Ferumoxytol, an iron oxide nanoparticle that targets phagocytic cells, can be used in magnetic resonance imaging of malignant brain tumors and can be administered as a bolus, allowing dynamic imaging. Our objectives were to determine the optimum time of delayed contrast enhancement of ferumoxytol, and to compare ferumoxytol and gadolinium contrast agents for magnetic resonance angiography and perfusion. METHODS: Twelve patients with malignant brain tumors underwent serial magnetic resonance imaging multiple times up to 72 hours after ferumoxytol injection at both 1.5 and 3-T. The enhancement time course was determined for ferumoxytol and compared with a baseline gadolinium scan. Perfusion, time-of-flight and dynamic magnetic resonance angiography and T1-weighted scans were compared for the two agents. RESULTS: The lesions were detectable at all field strengths, even with an intraoperative 0.15-T magnet. Maximal ferumoxytol enhancement intensity was at 24 to 28 hours after administration, and the enhancing volume subsequently expanded with time into a non-gadolinium-enhancing, high T2-weighted signal region of tumor-infiltrated brain. Dynamic studies were assessed with both agents, indicating early vascular leak with gadolinium but not with ferumoxytol. CONCLUSION: Our most important finding was that gadolinium leaks out of blood vessels early after injection, whereas ferumoxytol stays intravascular in the "early" phase, thereby increasing the accuracy of tumor perfusion assessment. As a magnetic resonance imaging contrast agent, ferumoxytol visualizes brain tumors at all field strengths evaluated, with delayed enhancement peaking at 24 to 28 hours after administration.

AB - OBJECTIVE: Ferumoxytol, an iron oxide nanoparticle that targets phagocytic cells, can be used in magnetic resonance imaging of malignant brain tumors and can be administered as a bolus, allowing dynamic imaging. Our objectives were to determine the optimum time of delayed contrast enhancement of ferumoxytol, and to compare ferumoxytol and gadolinium contrast agents for magnetic resonance angiography and perfusion. METHODS: Twelve patients with malignant brain tumors underwent serial magnetic resonance imaging multiple times up to 72 hours after ferumoxytol injection at both 1.5 and 3-T. The enhancement time course was determined for ferumoxytol and compared with a baseline gadolinium scan. Perfusion, time-of-flight and dynamic magnetic resonance angiography and T1-weighted scans were compared for the two agents. RESULTS: The lesions were detectable at all field strengths, even with an intraoperative 0.15-T magnet. Maximal ferumoxytol enhancement intensity was at 24 to 28 hours after administration, and the enhancing volume subsequently expanded with time into a non-gadolinium-enhancing, high T2-weighted signal region of tumor-infiltrated brain. Dynamic studies were assessed with both agents, indicating early vascular leak with gadolinium but not with ferumoxytol. CONCLUSION: Our most important finding was that gadolinium leaks out of blood vessels early after injection, whereas ferumoxytol stays intravascular in the "early" phase, thereby increasing the accuracy of tumor perfusion assessment. As a magnetic resonance imaging contrast agent, ferumoxytol visualizes brain tumors at all field strengths evaluated, with delayed enhancement peaking at 24 to 28 hours after administration.

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