The Omega-6

Omega-3 ratio: A critical appraisal and possible successor

William Harris

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The well-known health effects of the long-chain, marine omega-3 (n-3) fatty acids (FAs) has led to a growing interest in the prognostic value that blood levels of these FAs might have vis-à-vis cardiovascular and neurocognitive diseases. The measurement and expression of n-3 FA levels is not straight-forward, however, and a wide variety of means of expression of n-3 FA status have been used in research and clinical medicine. This has led to considerable confusion as to what “optimal” n-3 FA status is. The n-6:n-3 ratio has enjoyed relatively widespread use, but this apparently simple metric has both theoretical and practical difficulties that have contributed to misunderstandings in this field. Just as the once-popular polyunsaturated:saturated FA ratio has largely disappeared from the nutritional and medical literature, it may be time to replace the n-6:n-3 ratio with a newer metric that focuses on the primary deficiency in Western diets – the lack of eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acids (EPA and DHA). The Omega-3 Index (red blood cell EPA+DHA) has much to recommend it in this regard.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)34-40
Number of pages7
JournalProstaglandins Leukotrienes and Essential Fatty Acids
Volume132
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2018
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Omega-3 Fatty Acids
Blood
Fatty Acids
Polyunsaturated fatty acids
Eicosapentaenoic Acid
Docosahexaenoic Acids
Clinical Medicine
Nutrition
Unsaturated Fatty Acids
Medicine
Cardiovascular Diseases
Erythrocytes
Cells
Health
Research

Keywords

  • Arachidonic acid
  • Biomarkers
  • Docosahexaenoic acid
  • Eicosapentaenoic acid
  • Linoleic acid
  • Omega-3 fatty acids
  • Omega-3 index
  • Omega-6 fatty acids

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Biochemistry
  • Cell Biology

Cite this

The Omega-6 : Omega-3 ratio: A critical appraisal and possible successor. / Harris, William.

In: Prostaglandins Leukotrienes and Essential Fatty Acids, Vol. 132, 01.05.2018, p. 34-40.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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