The national mortality burden and significant factors associated with open and laparoscopic cholecystectomy

1997-2006

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

55 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Introduction: This study aims to determine the mortality rate and significant factors associated with laparoscopic (LC) and open cholecystectomies (OC) over a 10-year period. Methods: Using the Nationwide Inpatient Sample, we analyzed data for both LC and OC between 1997 and 2006. Cholecystectomies performed as part of another primary procedure were excluded. Using procedure-specific codes, we calculated annual national volumes for both open and laparoscopic cholecystectomies for the time period under review and the associated in-hospital mortality following both of these procedures. Using logistic regression modeling, we then analyzed selected patient and institutional characteristics to determine if a significant association existed between these factors and in-hospital mortality. Results: There was a 16% increase in the volume of LC and a corresponding decrease in open procedures over the 10 years under review. In 2006, 12% of cholecystectomies were still performed using an open approach and the associated mortality remained significantly higher than that seen with LC. Overall, after adjusting for patient and hospital characteristics, the mortality for OC was higher than that for LC (OR 4.57; 95% CI, 4.37-4.79, p

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2292-2301
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Gastrointestinal Surgery
Volume13
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2009

Fingerprint

Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy
Cholecystectomy
Hospital Mortality
Mortality
Inpatients
Logistic Models

Keywords

  • Cholecystectomy mortality
  • Laparoscopic cholecystectomy
  • Mortality
  • Mortality factors
  • Open cholecystectomy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Gastroenterology

Cite this

@article{95f4a86555264074925efad5aed34c95,
title = "The national mortality burden and significant factors associated with open and laparoscopic cholecystectomy: 1997-2006",
abstract = "Introduction: This study aims to determine the mortality rate and significant factors associated with laparoscopic (LC) and open cholecystectomies (OC) over a 10-year period. Methods: Using the Nationwide Inpatient Sample, we analyzed data for both LC and OC between 1997 and 2006. Cholecystectomies performed as part of another primary procedure were excluded. Using procedure-specific codes, we calculated annual national volumes for both open and laparoscopic cholecystectomies for the time period under review and the associated in-hospital mortality following both of these procedures. Using logistic regression modeling, we then analyzed selected patient and institutional characteristics to determine if a significant association existed between these factors and in-hospital mortality. Results: There was a 16{\%} increase in the volume of LC and a corresponding decrease in open procedures over the 10 years under review. In 2006, 12{\%} of cholecystectomies were still performed using an open approach and the associated mortality remained significantly higher than that seen with LC. Overall, after adjusting for patient and hospital characteristics, the mortality for OC was higher than that for LC (OR 4.57; 95{\%} CI, 4.37-4.79, p",
keywords = "Cholecystectomy mortality, Laparoscopic cholecystectomy, Mortality, Mortality factors, Open cholecystectomy",
author = "James Dolan and Diggs, {Brian S.} and Brett Sheppard and John Hunter",
year = "2009",
month = "12",
doi = "10.1007/s11605-009-0988-2",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "13",
pages = "2292--2301",
journal = "Journal of Gastrointestinal Surgery",
issn = "1091-255X",
publisher = "Springer New York",
number = "12",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - The national mortality burden and significant factors associated with open and laparoscopic cholecystectomy

T2 - 1997-2006

AU - Dolan, James

AU - Diggs, Brian S.

AU - Sheppard, Brett

AU - Hunter, John

PY - 2009/12

Y1 - 2009/12

N2 - Introduction: This study aims to determine the mortality rate and significant factors associated with laparoscopic (LC) and open cholecystectomies (OC) over a 10-year period. Methods: Using the Nationwide Inpatient Sample, we analyzed data for both LC and OC between 1997 and 2006. Cholecystectomies performed as part of another primary procedure were excluded. Using procedure-specific codes, we calculated annual national volumes for both open and laparoscopic cholecystectomies for the time period under review and the associated in-hospital mortality following both of these procedures. Using logistic regression modeling, we then analyzed selected patient and institutional characteristics to determine if a significant association existed between these factors and in-hospital mortality. Results: There was a 16% increase in the volume of LC and a corresponding decrease in open procedures over the 10 years under review. In 2006, 12% of cholecystectomies were still performed using an open approach and the associated mortality remained significantly higher than that seen with LC. Overall, after adjusting for patient and hospital characteristics, the mortality for OC was higher than that for LC (OR 4.57; 95% CI, 4.37-4.79, p

AB - Introduction: This study aims to determine the mortality rate and significant factors associated with laparoscopic (LC) and open cholecystectomies (OC) over a 10-year period. Methods: Using the Nationwide Inpatient Sample, we analyzed data for both LC and OC between 1997 and 2006. Cholecystectomies performed as part of another primary procedure were excluded. Using procedure-specific codes, we calculated annual national volumes for both open and laparoscopic cholecystectomies for the time period under review and the associated in-hospital mortality following both of these procedures. Using logistic regression modeling, we then analyzed selected patient and institutional characteristics to determine if a significant association existed between these factors and in-hospital mortality. Results: There was a 16% increase in the volume of LC and a corresponding decrease in open procedures over the 10 years under review. In 2006, 12% of cholecystectomies were still performed using an open approach and the associated mortality remained significantly higher than that seen with LC. Overall, after adjusting for patient and hospital characteristics, the mortality for OC was higher than that for LC (OR 4.57; 95% CI, 4.37-4.79, p

KW - Cholecystectomy mortality

KW - Laparoscopic cholecystectomy

KW - Mortality

KW - Mortality factors

KW - Open cholecystectomy

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=71149115074&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=71149115074&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1007/s11605-009-0988-2

DO - 10.1007/s11605-009-0988-2

M3 - Article

VL - 13

SP - 2292

EP - 2301

JO - Journal of Gastrointestinal Surgery

JF - Journal of Gastrointestinal Surgery

SN - 1091-255X

IS - 12

ER -