The molecular basis of idiopathic short stature

Ronald (Ron) Rosenfeld

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

38 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Forty years ago, when growth hormone (GH) first became available for use, the molecular basis for growth hormone deficiency (GHD) was entirely unknown. Despite continued difficulties with the biochemical diagnosis of GHD, we now accept the existence of underlying genetic abnormalities as the basis for disorders involving GH secretion. Similar challenges are encountered when one considers the causes of non-GHD short stature, namely idiopathic short stature (ISS). Categorization of the causes for ISS by insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) concentrations provides a basis for speculation about the potential for IGF-I gene polymorphisms or binding protein abnormalities influencing the development of ISS-related growth failure.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalGrowth Hormone and IGF Research
Volume15
Issue numberSUPPL.
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2005

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Growth Hormone
Insulin-Like Growth Factor I
Carrier Proteins
Hormones
Growth
Proteins

Keywords

  • Gene polymorphisms
  • Idiopathic short stature
  • Insulin-like growth factor I

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Endocrinology
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism

Cite this

The molecular basis of idiopathic short stature. / Rosenfeld, Ronald (Ron).

In: Growth Hormone and IGF Research, Vol. 15, No. SUPPL., 07.2005.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Rosenfeld, Ronald (Ron). / The molecular basis of idiopathic short stature. In: Growth Hormone and IGF Research. 2005 ; Vol. 15, No. SUPPL.
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