The moderating effects of work-family role combinations and work-family organizational culture on the relationship between family-friendly workplace supports and job satisfaction

Khatera Sahibzada, Leslie Hammer, Margaret B. Neal, Daniel C. Kuang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

36 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study determined whether work-family role combinations (i.e., work and elder care, work and child care, work and elder care and child care) and work-family culture significantly moderate the relationship between availability of workplace supports and job satisfaction. The data were obtained from the Families and Work Institute's 1997 archival data set, the National Study of the Changing Workforce (NCSW). As predicted, the relationship between availability of workplace supports and job satisfaction varied depending on the type of work-family role combinations and levels of work-family culture. Specifically, the relationship was significant for the elder care work-family role combination, in that higher levels of workplace supports in unsupportive work-family cultures were associated with the greatest levels of job satisfaction. In addition, it was found that a supportive work-family culture and an increase in workplace supports were related to a slight decrease in job satisfaction for the elder care work-family role combination.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)820-839
Number of pages20
JournalJournal of Family Issues
Volume26
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2005
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

family work
organizational culture
job satisfaction
workplace
child care

Keywords

  • Child care
  • Elder care
  • Family-friendly benefits and policies
  • Job satisfaction
  • Sandwich generation
  • Work-family culture

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)

Cite this

The moderating effects of work-family role combinations and work-family organizational culture on the relationship between family-friendly workplace supports and job satisfaction. / Sahibzada, Khatera; Hammer, Leslie; Neal, Margaret B.; Kuang, Daniel C.

In: Journal of Family Issues, Vol. 26, No. 6, 09.2005, p. 820-839.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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