The misguided ethics of crossover trials

Vinay Prasad, Christine Grady

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

20 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Crossover is increasingly favored in trials of cancer therapies; even those that seek to establish the basic efficacy of novel drugs. Crossover is done in part for trial recruitment, but also out of a sense of doing the right thing-offering the investigational agent to more patients. In this paper, we argue that this ethical inclination-that crossover is a preferred trial choice-is misguided. In seeking to sate the desires of participants, we might undermine a trial's ability to answer a meaningful clinical question. When a trial is incapable of answering a question, it becomes unethical. Using a crossover strategy in oncology clinical trials can make trials less ethical, not more.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)167-169
Number of pages3
JournalContemporary Clinical Trials
Volume37
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2014
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Ethics
Cross-Over Studies
Clinical Trials
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Neoplasms
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • Crossover
  • Ethics of clinical trials
  • Trial validity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmacology (medical)
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

The misguided ethics of crossover trials. / Prasad, Vinay; Grady, Christine.

In: Contemporary Clinical Trials, Vol. 37, No. 2, 03.2014, p. 167-169.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Prasad, Vinay ; Grady, Christine. / The misguided ethics of crossover trials. In: Contemporary Clinical Trials. 2014 ; Vol. 37, No. 2. pp. 167-169.
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