The Migration of Arizona's Post-Insanity Defense Procedures to a Modified GBMI Model

Scott E. Kirkorsky, Wanda Shao, Joseph Bloom

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Arizona's insanity defense and post-insanity procedures have evolved over the last 30 years into a unique system. Arizona moved from a typical M'Naughten-based insanity defense to an adaptation of the Oregon Psychiatric Security Review Board (PSRB) model and then to its current form, in which the PSRB is cast in a correctional framework. These changes have resulted in a correctional statute, with outcomes that may subject the guilty except insane (GEI) offender to a disposition similar to that of someone found guilty but mentally ill (GBMI). We review the literature on the GBMI defense first developed in Michigan in the 1970s and compare Arizona's current system to the earlier GBMI models. We conclude with a discussion of Arizona's GEI verdict and implications of managing these offenders in a correctional framework, resulting in a modified GBMI statute.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)217-223
Number of pages7
JournalThe journal of the American Academy of Psychiatry and the Law
Volume47
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2019

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Insanity Defense
Mentally Ill Persons
Psychiatry

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

The Migration of Arizona's Post-Insanity Defense Procedures to a Modified GBMI Model. / Kirkorsky, Scott E.; Shao, Wanda; Bloom, Joseph.

In: The journal of the American Academy of Psychiatry and the Law, Vol. 47, No. 2, 01.06.2019, p. 217-223.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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