The Maudsley long-term follow-up of child and adolescent depression. 3. Impact of comorbid conduct disorder on service use and costs in adulthood

Martin Knapp, Paul McCrone, Eric Fombonne, Jennifer Beecham, Gail Wostear

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

85 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Depression in childhood or adolescence often has morbidity implications continuing into adulthood, generating needs for specialist services and support. Aims: To estimate the patterns of service use and costs in adulthood of former patients. Method: Service use and other cost-related data were collected from former patients. Comparisons were made between those people with and without comorbid conduct disorder in childhood and with data for the general population. Results: Data on 91 people with depression (only) and 49 with comorbid conduct disorder revealed high adulthood service utilisation rates and costs. In-patient care and criminal justice services were used more frequently by the comorbid group and total costs were significantly higher. There were also indications of higher service use by the comorbid group than the general adult population. Conclusions: The high and enduring long-term costs associated with childhood depression and conduct disorder give further reason for early and effective intervention.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)19-23
Number of pages5
JournalBritish Journal of Psychiatry
Volume180
Issue numberJAN.
DOIs
StatePublished - 2002
Externally publishedYes

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Conduct Disorder
Depression
Costs and Cost Analysis
Criminal Law
Population
Patient Care
Morbidity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

The Maudsley long-term follow-up of child and adolescent depression. 3. Impact of comorbid conduct disorder on service use and costs in adulthood. / Knapp, Martin; McCrone, Paul; Fombonne, Eric; Beecham, Jennifer; Wostear, Gail.

In: British Journal of Psychiatry, Vol. 180, No. JAN., 2002, p. 19-23.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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