The longitudinal effects of work-family conflict and positive spillover on depressive symptoms among dual-earner couples

Leslie B. Hammer, Jennifer C. Cullen, Margaret B. Neal, Robert R. Sinclair, Margarita V. Shafiro

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

212 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study assessed longitudinal and cross-sectional relationships between work-family conflict, positive spillover, and depression in a national sample of 234 dual-earner couples. The authors also assessed crossover effects (i.e., the transmission of emotions, affect, or stress from 1 member of a dyad to another) of work-family conflict and positive spillover on spouses' depression. Two general findings of the study were that (a) positive spillover has a stronger impact on depression than does work-family conflict, and (b) the effects of spouses' positive spillover were more strongly related to decreased depression than were the effects of one's own positive spillover. Significant longitudinal effects were related to the crossover of positive spillover on decreased spouse depression.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)138-154
Number of pages17
JournalJournal of Occupational Health Psychology
Volume10
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2005

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Applied Psychology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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