The impact of surgery on survival of elderly women with endometrial cancer in the SEER program from 1992-2002

Amina Ahmed, Gideon Zamba, Koenraad De Geest, Charles F. Lynch

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

48 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: Few population-based studies have evaluated surgical treatment and outcomes in elderly patients with endometrial cancer. The National Cancer Institute's SEER, Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results, Program provides a database to examine this issue. The objective of this study was to determine the extent to which elderly women with endometrial cancer receive surgical treatment and to evaluate the impact of surgery on survival. Methods: Data were obtained from the SEER registries for expanded races from 1992-2002. The inclusion criteria were women ages 50 to 95 with pathologically confirmed endometrial cancer. Cases with multiple primaries were excluded. The data were examined with respect to histology, radiotherapy use, extent of surgery and FIGO stage. The survival data were analyzed using a Cox proportional hazard model. Chi-squared tests were used to examine the extent to which elderly women with endometrial cancer receive surgical treatment, hysterectomy at minimum. Endometrial cancer-specific mortality was analyzed. Results: 27,517 women were analyzed with 94% of the cohort receiving surgical treatments. There is a significant trend that suggests elderly women, aged 65+ years at time of endometrial cancer diagnosis, received surgical treatment less often than younger women (p <0.001). The age-adjusted hazard of death was reduced with surgical intervention. After adjustment for stage at diagnosis, histology, and radiotherapy, the hazard ratios for endometrial cancer-specific mortality were decreased when surgery was undertaken. Conclusions: In this population-based study, the poor prognosis associated with advanced age may be in part associated with the decreased frequency of surgical treatment. The reasons need to be further investigated. Continued efforts should be directed at providing surgical treatment for elderly patients with endometrial cancer.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)35-40
Number of pages6
JournalGynecologic Oncology
Volume111
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2008
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

SEER Program
Endometrial Neoplasms
Survival
Histology
Radiotherapy
Therapeutics
National Cancer Institute (U.S.)
Mortality
Hysterectomy
Proportional Hazards Models
Population
Registries
Databases

Keywords

  • Elderly
  • Endometrial cancer
  • Hysterectomy
  • SEER

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Obstetrics and Gynecology
  • Oncology

Cite this

The impact of surgery on survival of elderly women with endometrial cancer in the SEER program from 1992-2002. / Ahmed, Amina; Zamba, Gideon; De Geest, Koenraad; Lynch, Charles F.

In: Gynecologic Oncology, Vol. 111, No. 1, 10.2008, p. 35-40.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Objectives: Few population-based studies have evaluated surgical treatment and outcomes in elderly patients with endometrial cancer. The National Cancer Institute's SEER, Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results, Program provides a database to examine this issue. The objective of this study was to determine the extent to which elderly women with endometrial cancer receive surgical treatment and to evaluate the impact of surgery on survival. Methods: Data were obtained from the SEER registries for expanded races from 1992-2002. The inclusion criteria were women ages 50 to 95 with pathologically confirmed endometrial cancer. Cases with multiple primaries were excluded. The data were examined with respect to histology, radiotherapy use, extent of surgery and FIGO stage. The survival data were analyzed using a Cox proportional hazard model. Chi-squared tests were used to examine the extent to which elderly women with endometrial cancer receive surgical treatment, hysterectomy at minimum. Endometrial cancer-specific mortality was analyzed. Results: 27,517 women were analyzed with 94{\%} of the cohort receiving surgical treatments. There is a significant trend that suggests elderly women, aged 65+ years at time of endometrial cancer diagnosis, received surgical treatment less often than younger women (p <0.001). The age-adjusted hazard of death was reduced with surgical intervention. After adjustment for stage at diagnosis, histology, and radiotherapy, the hazard ratios for endometrial cancer-specific mortality were decreased when surgery was undertaken. Conclusions: In this population-based study, the poor prognosis associated with advanced age may be in part associated with the decreased frequency of surgical treatment. The reasons need to be further investigated. Continued efforts should be directed at providing surgical treatment for elderly patients with endometrial cancer.",
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