The impact of age on surgical goals for spinopelvic alignment in minimally invasive surgery for adult spinal deformity

Paul Park, Kai Ming Fu, Praveen V. Mummaneni, Juan S. Uribe, Michael Y. Wang, Stacie Tran, Adam S. Kanter, Pierce D. Nunley, David O. Okonkwo, Christopher I. Shaffrey, Gregory M. Mundis, Dean Chou, Robert Eastlack, Neel Anand, Khoi Than, Joseph M. Zavatsky, Richard G. Fessler

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2 Scopus citations

Abstract

OBJECTIVE Achieving appropriate spinopelvic alignment in deformity surgery has been correlated with improvement in pain and disability. Minimally invasive surgery (MIS) techniques have been used to treat adult spinal deformity (ASD); however, there is concern for inadequate sagittal plane correction. Because age can influence the degree of sagittal correction required, the purpose of this study was to analyze whether obtaining optimal spinopelvic alignment is required in the elderly to obtain clinical improvement. METHODS A multicenter database of ASD patients was queried. Inclusion criteria were age 18 years; an MIS component as part of the index procedure; at least one of the following: pelvic tilt (PT) > 20 , sagittal vertical axis (SVA) > 50 mm, pelvic incidence to lumbar lordosis (PI-LL) mismatch > 10 , or coronal curve > 20 ; and minimum follow-up of 2 years. Patients were stratified into younger (< 65 years) and older ( 65 years) cohorts. Within each cohort, patients were categorized into aligned (AL) or mal-aligned (MAL) subgroups based on postoperative radiographic measurements. Mal-alignment was defined as a PI-LL > 10 or SVA > 50 mm. Pre- and postoperative radiographic and clinical outcomes were compared. RESULTS Of the 185 patients, 107 were in the younger cohort and 78 in the older cohort. Based on postoperative radiographs, 36 (33.6%) of the younger patients were in the AL subgroup and 71 (66.4%) were in the MAL subgroup. The older patients were divided into 2 subgroups based on alignment; there were 26 (33.3%) patients in the AL and 52 (66.7%) in the MAL subgroups. Overall, patients within both younger and older cohorts significantly improved with regard to postoperative visual analog scale (VAS) scores for back and leg pain and Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) scores. In the younger cohort, there were no significant differences in postoperative VAS back and leg pain scores between the AL and MAL subgroups. However, the postoperative ODI score of 37.9 in the MAL subgroup was significantly worse than the ODI score of 28.5 in the AL subgroup (p = 0.019). In the older cohort, there were no significant differences in postoperative VAS back and leg pain score or ODI between the AL and MAL subgroups. CONCLUSIONS MIS techniques did not achieve optimal spinopelvic alignment in most cases. However, age appears to impact the degree of sagittal correction required. In older patients, optimal spinopelvic alignment thresholds did not need to be achieved to obtain similar symptomatic improvement. Conversely, in younger patients stricter adherence to optimal spinopelvic alignment thresholds may be needed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)560-564
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Neurosurgery: Spine
Volume29
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2018

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Keywords

  • Age
  • Deformity
  • Elderly
  • Minimally invasive
  • Outcomes
  • Sagittal balance
  • Spine
  • Spinopelvic alignment
  • Surgery

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Neurology
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Park, P., Fu, K. M., Mummaneni, P. V., Uribe, J. S., Wang, M. Y., Tran, S., Kanter, A. S., Nunley, P. D., Okonkwo, D. O., Shaffrey, C. I., Mundis, G. M., Chou, D., Eastlack, R., Anand, N., Than, K., Zavatsky, J. M., & Fessler, R. G. (2018). The impact of age on surgical goals for spinopelvic alignment in minimally invasive surgery for adult spinal deformity. Journal of Neurosurgery: Spine, 29(5), 560-564. https://doi.org/10.3171/2018.4.SPINE171153