The function and regulation of the primate corpus luteum during the fertile menstrual cycle.

Richard Stouffer, J. S. Ottobre, T. A. Molskness, Mary Zelinski

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    5 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Figure 2 summarizes the changes in endocrine function and the factors which regulate the primate corpus luteum during the fertile menstrual cycle. The classical luteotropic role of LH during the menstrual cycle is superceded by CG at or before the time of implantation. The role of local factors in modulating luteal function is an area of continued research, as some factors are deemed less important (i.e., estrogen, at least prior to luteal rescue) and other possibilities (progesterone, prostaglandins, and relaxin) arise. The role of local factors has not yet been studied in the corpus luteum following its rescue in early pregnancy. Finally, it is apparent that a different type of "shift" precedes the recognized luteal-placental shift in early pregnancy, when the corpus luteum enhances or begins new activities as progesterone secretion declines. These new or augmented activities occur despite apparent desensitization of CG-responsive cAMP-mediated pathways in luteal cells. Although the cellular events promoting these changes are not known, it seems reasonable to propose that the resulting products, including estrogen (as discussed in Dr. Moudgal's chapter) and relaxin are important in early pregnancy. Thus the term "luteal-placental shift" may be a misnomer, as other activities which promote gestation continue within the corpus luteum for a limited time.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)129-142
    Number of pages14
    JournalProgress in Clinical and Biological Research
    Volume294
    StatePublished - 1989

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    Corpus Luteum
    Menstrual Cycle
    Primates
    Relaxin
    Pregnancy
    Progesterone
    Estrogens
    Luteal Cells
    Prostaglandins
    Research

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Medicine(all)

    Cite this

    The function and regulation of the primate corpus luteum during the fertile menstrual cycle. / Stouffer, Richard; Ottobre, J. S.; Molskness, T. A.; Zelinski, Mary.

    In: Progress in Clinical and Biological Research, Vol. 294, 1989, p. 129-142.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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    N2 - Figure 2 summarizes the changes in endocrine function and the factors which regulate the primate corpus luteum during the fertile menstrual cycle. The classical luteotropic role of LH during the menstrual cycle is superceded by CG at or before the time of implantation. The role of local factors in modulating luteal function is an area of continued research, as some factors are deemed less important (i.e., estrogen, at least prior to luteal rescue) and other possibilities (progesterone, prostaglandins, and relaxin) arise. The role of local factors has not yet been studied in the corpus luteum following its rescue in early pregnancy. Finally, it is apparent that a different type of "shift" precedes the recognized luteal-placental shift in early pregnancy, when the corpus luteum enhances or begins new activities as progesterone secretion declines. These new or augmented activities occur despite apparent desensitization of CG-responsive cAMP-mediated pathways in luteal cells. Although the cellular events promoting these changes are not known, it seems reasonable to propose that the resulting products, including estrogen (as discussed in Dr. Moudgal's chapter) and relaxin are important in early pregnancy. Thus the term "luteal-placental shift" may be a misnomer, as other activities which promote gestation continue within the corpus luteum for a limited time.

    AB - Figure 2 summarizes the changes in endocrine function and the factors which regulate the primate corpus luteum during the fertile menstrual cycle. The classical luteotropic role of LH during the menstrual cycle is superceded by CG at or before the time of implantation. The role of local factors in modulating luteal function is an area of continued research, as some factors are deemed less important (i.e., estrogen, at least prior to luteal rescue) and other possibilities (progesterone, prostaglandins, and relaxin) arise. The role of local factors has not yet been studied in the corpus luteum following its rescue in early pregnancy. Finally, it is apparent that a different type of "shift" precedes the recognized luteal-placental shift in early pregnancy, when the corpus luteum enhances or begins new activities as progesterone secretion declines. These new or augmented activities occur despite apparent desensitization of CG-responsive cAMP-mediated pathways in luteal cells. Although the cellular events promoting these changes are not known, it seems reasonable to propose that the resulting products, including estrogen (as discussed in Dr. Moudgal's chapter) and relaxin are important in early pregnancy. Thus the term "luteal-placental shift" may be a misnomer, as other activities which promote gestation continue within the corpus luteum for a limited time.

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