The Electronic Health Record Objective Structured Clinical Examination: Assessing Student Competency in Patient Interactions While Using the Electronic Health Record

Frances Biagioli, Diane Elliot, Ryan T. Palmer, Carla C. Graichen, Rebecca E. Rdesinski, Kaparaboyna Ashok Kumar, Ari B. Galper, James W. Tysinger

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

PROBLEM: Because many medical students do not have access to electronic health records (EHRs) in the clinical environment, simulated EHR training is necessary. Explicitly training medical students to use EHRs appropriately during patient encounters equips them to engage patients while also attending to the accuracy of the record and contributing to a culture of information safety. APPROACH: Faculty developed and successfully implemented an EHR objective structured clinical examination (EHR-OSCE) for clerkship students at two institutions. The EHR-OSCE objectives include assessing EHR-related communication and data management skills. OUTCOMES: The authors collected performance data for students (n = 71) at the first institution during academic years 2011–2013 and for students (n = 211) at the second institution during academic year 2013–2014. EHR-OSCE assessment checklist scores showed that students performed well in EHR-related communication tasks, such as maintaining eye contact and stopping all computer work when the patient expresses worry. Findings indicated student EHR skill deficiencies in the areas of EHR data management including medical history review, medication reconciliation, and allergy reconciliation. Most students’ EHR skills failed to improve as the year progressed, suggesting that they did not gain the EHR training and experience they need in clinics and hospitals. NEXT STEPS: Cross-institutional data comparisons will help determine whether differences in curricula affect students’ EHR skills. National and institutional policies and faculty development are needed to ensure that students receive adequate EHR education, including hands-on experience in the clinic as well as simulated EHR practice.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalAcademic Medicine
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jun 21 2016

Fingerprint

Electronic Health Records
electronics
Students
examination
interaction
health
student
OSCE
Medical Students
reconciliation
medical student
Medication Reconciliation
Clinical Clerkship
Communication
Forms and Records Control
Organizational Policy
Safety Management
allergy
communication
Policy Making

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Education

Cite this

The Electronic Health Record Objective Structured Clinical Examination : Assessing Student Competency in Patient Interactions While Using the Electronic Health Record. / Biagioli, Frances; Elliot, Diane; Palmer, Ryan T.; Graichen, Carla C.; Rdesinski, Rebecca E.; Ashok Kumar, Kaparaboyna; Galper, Ari B.; Tysinger, James W.

In: Academic Medicine, 21.06.2016.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Biagioli, Frances ; Elliot, Diane ; Palmer, Ryan T. ; Graichen, Carla C. ; Rdesinski, Rebecca E. ; Ashok Kumar, Kaparaboyna ; Galper, Ari B. ; Tysinger, James W. / The Electronic Health Record Objective Structured Clinical Examination : Assessing Student Competency in Patient Interactions While Using the Electronic Health Record. In: Academic Medicine. 2016.
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