The effects of obesity on the first stage of labor.

Shayna M. Norman, Methodius G. Tuuli, Anthony O. Odibo, Aaron Caughey, Kimberly A. Roehl, Alison G. Cahill

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

72 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

To estimate the effects of obesity on the duration and progression of the first stage of labor in a predominantly obese population and estimate the dose-effect with increasing classes of obesity. We performed a retrospective cohort study of labor progression among 5,204 consecutive parturients with singleton term pregnancies (37 weeks of gestation or more) and vertex presentation who completed the first stage of labor. Two comparison groups were defined by body mass index (BMI) less than 30 (n=2,413) or 30 or more (n=2,791). Repeated-measures analysis with polynomial modeling was used to construct labor curves. The duration and progression among women with BMIs less than 30 and BMIs of 30 or more were compared in a multivariable interval-censored regression model adjusting for parity, type of labor onset, race, and birth weight more than 4,000 g. The labor curves indicate longer duration and slower progression of the first stage of labor among women with BMIs of 30 or more for both nulliparous and multiparous women. Multivariable interval-censored regression analysis confirmed significantly longer duration (4-10 cm: 4.7 compared with 4.1 hours, P

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)130-135
Number of pages6
JournalObstetrics and Gynecology
Volume120
Issue number1
StatePublished - Jul 2012

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First Labor Stage
Obesity
Labor Onset
Pregnancy
Parity
Birth Weight
Body Mass Index
Cohort Studies
Retrospective Studies
Regression Analysis
Parturition
Population

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

Cite this

Norman, S. M., Tuuli, M. G., Odibo, A. O., Caughey, A., Roehl, K. A., & Cahill, A. G. (2012). The effects of obesity on the first stage of labor. Obstetrics and Gynecology, 120(1), 130-135.

The effects of obesity on the first stage of labor. / Norman, Shayna M.; Tuuli, Methodius G.; Odibo, Anthony O.; Caughey, Aaron; Roehl, Kimberly A.; Cahill, Alison G.

In: Obstetrics and Gynecology, Vol. 120, No. 1, 07.2012, p. 130-135.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Norman, SM, Tuuli, MG, Odibo, AO, Caughey, A, Roehl, KA & Cahill, AG 2012, 'The effects of obesity on the first stage of labor.', Obstetrics and Gynecology, vol. 120, no. 1, pp. 130-135.
Norman SM, Tuuli MG, Odibo AO, Caughey A, Roehl KA, Cahill AG. The effects of obesity on the first stage of labor. Obstetrics and Gynecology. 2012 Jul;120(1):130-135.
Norman, Shayna M. ; Tuuli, Methodius G. ; Odibo, Anthony O. ; Caughey, Aaron ; Roehl, Kimberly A. ; Cahill, Alison G. / The effects of obesity on the first stage of labor. In: Obstetrics and Gynecology. 2012 ; Vol. 120, No. 1. pp. 130-135.
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