The effects of maternal obesity on perinatal outcomes among those born small for gestational age*

Ruofan Yao, Bo Y. Park, Aaron Caughey

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: Maternal obesity has been associated with higher birth weight. Small for gestational age (SGA) neonates born to obese women may be associated with pathological growth with increased neonatal complications. Methods: This was a retrospective cohort study of all non-anomalous singleton neonates born in Texas from 2006–2011. Analyses were limited to births between 34 and 42 weeks gestation with birth weight ≤10th percentile. Results were stratified by maternal pre-pregnancy BMI class. The risk for stillbirth, neonatal death, neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) admission and five minute Apgar scores <7 were estimated for each obesity class and compared to the normal weight group. Multivariable logistic regression analyses were performed to control for potential confounding variables. Results: The rate of stillbirth was 1.4/1000 births for normal weight women, and 2.9/1000 among obese women (p < 0.001, aOR: 1.83 [1.43, 2.34]). The rate of neonatal deaths among normal weight women was 4.3/1000 births, whereas among obese women it was 4.7/1000 (p = 0.94, aOR: 1.10 [0.92, 1.30]). A dose-dependent relationship between maternal obesity and stillbirths was seen, but not for other neonatal outcomes. Conclusion: Among SGA neonates, maternal pre-pregnancy obesity was associated with increased risks for stillbirth, NICU admission and low Apgar scores but not neonatal death.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-6
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Maternal-Fetal and Neonatal Medicine
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Aug 18 2016

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Keywords

  • Growth restriction
  • neonatal outcomes
  • obesity
  • small for gestational age
  • stillbirth

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

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