The effects of alcohol withdrawal and acute doses of alcohol on the acid-base balance in mice and rats

M. A. Mitchell, John Belknap

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

While respiratory alkalosis has been reported to occur in human alcoholics during the withdrawal period, and may causally contribute to the expression of the withdrawal syndrome, we found no evidence of this in either alcohol physically-dependent mice (DBA/2J) or rats (Sprague-Dawley) as reflected in blood pH, plasma pCO2, or intracellular brain pH relative to pair-fed control (no alcohol) animals. The inhalation of atmospheres high in CO2 (5% and 15%), which would be expected to reverse a respiratory alkalotic state, had no effect on the expression of the withdrawal syndrome in alcohol-dependent mice. These results indicate that a withdrawal syndrome of considerable intensity can develop in mice and rats in the absence of an alkalotic state.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)283-294
Number of pages12
JournalDrug and Alcohol Dependence
Volume10
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 1982
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Acid-Base Equilibrium
withdrawal
Rats
alcohol
Alcohols
Respiratory Alkalosis
Inbred DBA Mouse
Alcoholics
Atmosphere
Inhalation
Sprague Dawley Rats
Brain
Animals
Blood
alcoholism
Plasmas
brain
animal
evidence

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Behavioral Neuroscience
  • Toxicology
  • Health(social science)

Cite this

The effects of alcohol withdrawal and acute doses of alcohol on the acid-base balance in mice and rats. / Mitchell, M. A.; Belknap, John.

In: Drug and Alcohol Dependence, Vol. 10, No. 4, 1982, p. 283-294.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{c65d6bdf619b4790bee7d4a636630515,
title = "The effects of alcohol withdrawal and acute doses of alcohol on the acid-base balance in mice and rats",
abstract = "While respiratory alkalosis has been reported to occur in human alcoholics during the withdrawal period, and may causally contribute to the expression of the withdrawal syndrome, we found no evidence of this in either alcohol physically-dependent mice (DBA/2J) or rats (Sprague-Dawley) as reflected in blood pH, plasma pCO2, or intracellular brain pH relative to pair-fed control (no alcohol) animals. The inhalation of atmospheres high in CO2 (5{\%} and 15{\%}), which would be expected to reverse a respiratory alkalotic state, had no effect on the expression of the withdrawal syndrome in alcohol-dependent mice. These results indicate that a withdrawal syndrome of considerable intensity can develop in mice and rats in the absence of an alkalotic state.",
author = "Mitchell, {M. A.} and John Belknap",
year = "1982",
doi = "10.1016/0376-8716(82)90031-X",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "10",
pages = "283--294",
journal = "Drug and Alcohol Dependence",
issn = "0376-8716",
publisher = "Elsevier Ireland Ltd",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - The effects of alcohol withdrawal and acute doses of alcohol on the acid-base balance in mice and rats

AU - Mitchell, M. A.

AU - Belknap, John

PY - 1982

Y1 - 1982

N2 - While respiratory alkalosis has been reported to occur in human alcoholics during the withdrawal period, and may causally contribute to the expression of the withdrawal syndrome, we found no evidence of this in either alcohol physically-dependent mice (DBA/2J) or rats (Sprague-Dawley) as reflected in blood pH, plasma pCO2, or intracellular brain pH relative to pair-fed control (no alcohol) animals. The inhalation of atmospheres high in CO2 (5% and 15%), which would be expected to reverse a respiratory alkalotic state, had no effect on the expression of the withdrawal syndrome in alcohol-dependent mice. These results indicate that a withdrawal syndrome of considerable intensity can develop in mice and rats in the absence of an alkalotic state.

AB - While respiratory alkalosis has been reported to occur in human alcoholics during the withdrawal period, and may causally contribute to the expression of the withdrawal syndrome, we found no evidence of this in either alcohol physically-dependent mice (DBA/2J) or rats (Sprague-Dawley) as reflected in blood pH, plasma pCO2, or intracellular brain pH relative to pair-fed control (no alcohol) animals. The inhalation of atmospheres high in CO2 (5% and 15%), which would be expected to reverse a respiratory alkalotic state, had no effect on the expression of the withdrawal syndrome in alcohol-dependent mice. These results indicate that a withdrawal syndrome of considerable intensity can develop in mice and rats in the absence of an alkalotic state.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0020366702&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0020366702&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/0376-8716(82)90031-X

DO - 10.1016/0376-8716(82)90031-X

M3 - Article

VL - 10

SP - 283

EP - 294

JO - Drug and Alcohol Dependence

JF - Drug and Alcohol Dependence

SN - 0376-8716

IS - 4

ER -