The effects of a leukocyte-depleting filter on cerebral and renal recovery after deep hypothermic circulatory arrest

Stephen M. Langley, Paul J. Chai, Steven S. Tsui, James J. Jaggers, Ross M. Ungerleider

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Abstract

Objective: The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of a leukocyte-depleting filter on cerebral and renal recovery after deep hypothermic circulatory arrest. Methods: Sixteen 1-week-old piglets underwent cardiopulmonary bypass, were cooled to 18°C, and underwent 60 minutes of circulatory arrest, followed by 60 minutes of reperfusion and rewarming. Global and regional cerebral blood flow, cerebral oxygen metabolism, and renal blood flow were determined before cardiopulmonary bypass, after the institution of cardiopulmonary bypass, and at 1 hour of deep hypothermic circulatory arrest. In the study group (n = 8 piglets), a leukocyte-depleting arterial blood filter was placed in the arterial side of the cardiopulmonary bypass circuit. Results: With cardiopulmonary bypass, no detectable change occurred in the cerebral blood flow, cerebral oxygen metabolism, and renal blood flow in either group, compared with before cardiopulmonary bypass. In control animals, after deep hypothermic circulatory arrest, blood flow was reduced to all regions of the brain (P <.004) and the kidneys (P = .02), compared with before deep hypothermic circulatory arrest. Cerebral oxygen metabolism was also significantly reduced to 60.1% ± 11.3% of the value before deep hypothermic circulatory arrest (P = .001). In the leukocyte- depleting filter group, the regional cerebral blood flow after deep hypothermic circulatory arrest was reduced, compared with the value before deep hypothermic circulatory arrest (P <.01). Percentage recovery of cerebral blood flow was higher in the leukocyte filter group than in the control animals in all regions but not significantly so (P >. 1). The cerebral oxygen metabolism fell to 66.0% ± 22.3% of the level before deep hypothermic circulatory arrest, which was greater than the recovery in the control animals but not significantly so (P = .5). After deep hypothermic circulatory arrest, the renal blood flow fell to 81.0% ± 29.5% of the value before deep hypothermic circulatory arrest (P = .06). Improvement in renal blood flow in the leukocyte filter group was not significantly greater than the recovery to 70.2% ± 26.3% in control animals (P = .47). Conclusions: After a period of deep hypothermic circulatory arrest, there is a significant reduction in cerebral blood flow, cerebral oxygen metabolism, and renal blood flow. Leukocyte depletion with an in-line arterial filter does not appear to significantly improve these findings in the neonatal piglet.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1262-1269
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery
Volume119
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2000
Externally publishedYes

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ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine
  • Surgery

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