The Effect of Tissue Expansion on Previously Irradiated Skin

William J. Kane, Thomas V. Mccaffrey, Tom Wang, Thomas M. Koval

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Opinion remains divided over the advisability of tissue expansion in previously irradiated skin. We examined the properties of, and complications associated with, tissue expansion in previously irradiated rabbit scalps. Irradiation injury was produced using fractionated roentgen rays, with a total dose of 5000 cGy over a 5-week interval. Following a 20-week convalescence interval, expansion was incrementally conducted over 4 weeks. Monitored parameters included cutaneous perfusion as indicated by fiberoptic dermofluorometry, intraluminal pressure, linear surface gain, and area of surface necrosis. The incidence and severity of complications, including surface necrosis, were significantly higher among irradiated animals. Furthermore, the overlying skin of irradiated animals demonstrated a significantly decreased compliance and measurable area gain. Given the inferior expandability and higher tendency toward complications with contemporary expansion techniques in previously irradiated skin, alternate reconstructive options are preferable in this setting. (Arch Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 1992;118:419-426).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)419-426
Number of pages8
JournalArchives of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery
Volume118
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 1992
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Tissue Expansion
Skin
Necrosis
Scalp
Compliance
Perfusion
Head
X-Rays
Rabbits
Pressure
Incidence
Wounds and Injuries

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Otorhinolaryngology
  • Surgery

Cite this

The Effect of Tissue Expansion on Previously Irradiated Skin. / Kane, William J.; Mccaffrey, Thomas V.; Wang, Tom; Koval, Thomas M.

In: Archives of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery, Vol. 118, No. 4, 1992, p. 419-426.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kane, William J. ; Mccaffrey, Thomas V. ; Wang, Tom ; Koval, Thomas M. / The Effect of Tissue Expansion on Previously Irradiated Skin. In: Archives of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery. 1992 ; Vol. 118, No. 4. pp. 419-426.
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