The effect of pancreatic polypeptide infusion on glucose tolerance and insulin response in longitudinally studied pancreatitis-induced diabetes

J. A. Bastidas, N. F. Couse, C. J. Yeo, R. E. Schmieg, Dana Andersen, R. L. Gingerich, M. J. Zinner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Glucose tolerance is often associated with pancreatitis. Pancreatitis-induced diabetes represents a different clinical syndrome than type I and type II diabetes mellitus. Patients with pancreatitis-induced diabetes may be extremely sensitive to exogenous insulin, rarely develop ketoacidosis, and rarely exhibit classic diabetic complications, such as retinopathy, nephropathy, or accelerated vasculopathy. Pancreatic polypeptide (PP) deficiency has been implicated in the defect of glucose homeostasis found after pancreatitis. This study evaluated intravenous and oral glucose tolerance and insulin response to glucose loading, in the setting of pancreatitis, with and without short-term PP replacement. Dogs (n = 7) underwent pancreatic duct ligation (PDL) and were studied with and without PP infusion (2 μg/kg/hr) before PDL and at 1 week, 6 weeks, and 4 months after PDL by means of intravenous and oral glucose tolerance tests. Basal and bombesin-stimulated PP levels at 4 months after PDL were subnormal, verifying PP deficiency in these animals with pancreatitis. PP levels during PP infusion reproduced normal postcibal levels, averaging 897 ± 40 pg/ml. Glucose tolerance, expressed as the glucose decay constant for the intravenous glucose tolerance tests and as the integrated glucose response for the oral glucose tolerance tests, deteriorated over time and was not improved by acute PP replacement. The integrated insulin response to glucose was not affected by PP. The acute infusion of PP at a dose that reproduces normal postprandial PP levels fails to improve glucose tolerance or augment insulin release in this model of pancreatitis-induced diabetes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)661-668
Number of pages8
JournalSurgery
Volume107
Issue number6
StatePublished - 1990
Externally publishedYes

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Pancreatic Polypeptide
Pancreatitis
Insulin
Glucose
Glucose Tolerance Test
Pancreatic Ducts
Ligation
Bombesin
Ketosis
Diabetes Complications
Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus
Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus
Homeostasis
Dogs

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Cite this

Bastidas, J. A., Couse, N. F., Yeo, C. J., Schmieg, R. E., Andersen, D., Gingerich, R. L., & Zinner, M. J. (1990). The effect of pancreatic polypeptide infusion on glucose tolerance and insulin response in longitudinally studied pancreatitis-induced diabetes. Surgery, 107(6), 661-668.

The effect of pancreatic polypeptide infusion on glucose tolerance and insulin response in longitudinally studied pancreatitis-induced diabetes. / Bastidas, J. A.; Couse, N. F.; Yeo, C. J.; Schmieg, R. E.; Andersen, Dana; Gingerich, R. L.; Zinner, M. J.

In: Surgery, Vol. 107, No. 6, 1990, p. 661-668.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Bastidas, JA, Couse, NF, Yeo, CJ, Schmieg, RE, Andersen, D, Gingerich, RL & Zinner, MJ 1990, 'The effect of pancreatic polypeptide infusion on glucose tolerance and insulin response in longitudinally studied pancreatitis-induced diabetes', Surgery, vol. 107, no. 6, pp. 661-668.
Bastidas, J. A. ; Couse, N. F. ; Yeo, C. J. ; Schmieg, R. E. ; Andersen, Dana ; Gingerich, R. L. ; Zinner, M. J. / The effect of pancreatic polypeptide infusion on glucose tolerance and insulin response in longitudinally studied pancreatitis-induced diabetes. In: Surgery. 1990 ; Vol. 107, No. 6. pp. 661-668.
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