The effect of caregiving on preventive care for people with disabilities

Eric W. Jamoom, Elena Andresen, Britta Neugaard, Sarah L. McKune

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Overall, disparities exist in preventive health care services for people with disabilities compared with other Americans. Little is known about the effects of caregiving on preventive services use. This study examines caregiver characteristics and influence on the use of preventive services for people with disabilities. Methods: The 2000-2001 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System of 25 states included 5486 self-reported respondents with disabilities who were surveyed for preventive care use. Multivariate logistic regression adjusted for demographic and functional status of these respondents. Results: Among the subset of the respondents with caregivers, those with paid caregivers were significantly more likely to receive an influenza vaccination (adjusted odds ratio [OR], 1.49; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.08-1.93). Among those with a caregiver, those with a spouse/partner caregiver were also significantly more likely to receive an influenza vaccination (adjusted OR, 1.33; 95% CI, 1.05-1.69) or PPV (adjusted OR, 1.59; 95% CI, 1.41-2.38) compared with those with "other" as their caregiver. Women with disabilities with a spouse/partner caregiver were significantly more likely to have ever had a Pap test (adjusted OR, 3.13; 95% CI, 1.41-6.67) or mammogram (adjusted OR, 1.85; 95% CI, 1.23-2.70) than those with "other" relative caregiver. Those respondents who reported "rarely adequate" caregiver satisfaction were significantly more likely to have self-reported ever having colon cancer screening compared with those with a usually adequate caregiver. The majority of results did not show consistent evidence of caregiver benefit, and a fair number of the associations were not statistically significant. Conclusion: The findings suggest that having a caregiver is not consistently associated with self-report of ever using preventive services. However, this study suggests that caregiver characteristics are associated with preventive care for people with disabilities. For influenza vaccination, our results showed that paid caregivers were more likely to provide preventive care to individuals with disability than a spouse or partner, which were more likely to provide more preventive care than those with "other" caregiver. Given the number of comparisons, we consider these results to be preliminary and require more confirmation in other population data.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)51-57
Number of pages7
JournalDisability and Health Journal
Volume1
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2008
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Preventive Medicine
Disabled Persons
Caregivers
Odds Ratio
Confidence Intervals
Preventive Health Services
Human Influenza
Vaccination
Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System
Papanicolaou Test
Spouses
Early Detection of Cancer
Colonic Neoplasms
Self Report

Keywords

  • Access to care
  • Caregiving
  • Disability
  • Preventive care
  • Screening

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

The effect of caregiving on preventive care for people with disabilities. / Jamoom, Eric W.; Andresen, Elena; Neugaard, Britta; McKune, Sarah L.

In: Disability and Health Journal, Vol. 1, No. 1, 01.2008, p. 51-57.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Jamoom, Eric W. ; Andresen, Elena ; Neugaard, Britta ; McKune, Sarah L. / The effect of caregiving on preventive care for people with disabilities. In: Disability and Health Journal. 2008 ; Vol. 1, No. 1. pp. 51-57.
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