The dynamic relationship between physical function and cognition in longitudinal aging cohorts

Sean A P Clouston, Paul Brewster, Diana Kuh, Marcus Richards, Rachel Cooper, Rebecca Hardy, Marcie S. Rubin, Scott Hofer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

121 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

On average, older people remember less and walk more slowly than do younger persons. Some researchers argue that this is due in part to a common biologic process underlying age-related declines in both physical and cognitive functioning. Only recently have longitudinal data become available for analyzing this claim. We conducted a systematic review of English-language research published between 2000 and 2011 to evaluate the relations between rates of change in physical and cognitive functioning in older cohorts. Physical functioning was assessed using objective measures: walking speed, grip strength, chair rise time, flamingo stand time, and summary measures of physical functioning. Cognition was measured using mental state examinations, fluid cognition, and diagnosis of impairment. Results depended on measurement type: Change in grip strength was more strongly correlated with mental state, while change in walking speed was more strongly correlated with change in fluid cognition. Examining physical and cognitive functioning can help clinicians and researchers to better identify individuals and groups that are aging differently and at different rates. In future research, investigators should consider the importance of identifying different patterns and rates of decline, examine relations between more diverse types of measures, and analyze the order in which age-related declines occur.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)33-50
Number of pages18
JournalEpidemiologic Reviews
Volume35
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2013
Externally publishedYes

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Cognition
Research Personnel
Hand Strength
Language
Research
Walking Speed

Keywords

  • aging
  • cognition
  • correlated change
  • longitudinal analysis
  • meta-analysis
  • physical functioning
  • systematic review

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology

Cite this

The dynamic relationship between physical function and cognition in longitudinal aging cohorts. / Clouston, Sean A P; Brewster, Paul; Kuh, Diana; Richards, Marcus; Cooper, Rachel; Hardy, Rebecca; Rubin, Marcie S.; Hofer, Scott.

In: Epidemiologic Reviews, Vol. 35, No. 1, 2013, p. 33-50.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Clouston, SAP, Brewster, P, Kuh, D, Richards, M, Cooper, R, Hardy, R, Rubin, MS & Hofer, S 2013, 'The dynamic relationship between physical function and cognition in longitudinal aging cohorts', Epidemiologic Reviews, vol. 35, no. 1, pp. 33-50. https://doi.org/10.1093/epirev/mxs004
Clouston, Sean A P ; Brewster, Paul ; Kuh, Diana ; Richards, Marcus ; Cooper, Rachel ; Hardy, Rebecca ; Rubin, Marcie S. ; Hofer, Scott. / The dynamic relationship between physical function and cognition in longitudinal aging cohorts. In: Epidemiologic Reviews. 2013 ; Vol. 35, No. 1. pp. 33-50.
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