The discourse marker "so" in turn-taking and turn-releasing behavior

Emma Rennie, Rebecca Lunsford, Peter Heeman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Although so is a recognized discourse marker, little work has explored its uses in turn-taking, especially when it is not followed by additional speech. In this paper we explore the use of the discourse marker so as it pertains to turn-taking and turnreleasing. Specifically, we compare the duration and intensity of so when used to take a turn, mid-utterance, and when releasing a turn. We found that durations of turn-retaining tokens are generally shorter than turn-releases; we also found that turnretaining tokens tend to be lower in intensity than the following speech. These trends of turn-taking behavior alongside certain lexical and prosodic features may prove useful for the development of speech-recognition software.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1280-1284
Number of pages5
JournalUnknown Journal
Volume08-12-September-2016
DOIs
StatePublished - 2016

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Speech Recognition Software
Speech recognition
Speech Recognition
Discourse
Discourse Markers
Turn-taking
Tend
Software
Speech
Utterance

Keywords

  • Discourse markers
  • Prosody
  • Turn-taking

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Language and Linguistics
  • Human-Computer Interaction
  • Signal Processing
  • Software
  • Modeling and Simulation

Cite this

The discourse marker "so" in turn-taking and turn-releasing behavior. / Rennie, Emma; Lunsford, Rebecca; Heeman, Peter.

In: Unknown Journal, Vol. 08-12-September-2016, 2016, p. 1280-1284.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Rennie, Emma ; Lunsford, Rebecca ; Heeman, Peter. / The discourse marker "so" in turn-taking and turn-releasing behavior. In: Unknown Journal. 2016 ; Vol. 08-12-September-2016. pp. 1280-1284.
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