The clinical spectrum of schwannomas presenting with visual dysfunction

A clinicopathologic study of three cases

Kimberly Peele Cockerham, Glenn C. Cockerham, Richard Stutzman, Ahmed A. Hidayat, Mark H. Depper, Roger E. Turbin, John S. Kennerdell

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

23 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Schwannomas (neurilemomas) are benign tumors that arise from Schwann cells in the peripheral nervous system. The most commonly involved nerves that cause neuro-ophthalmic manifestations are cranial nerves V and VIII. In this series of three women, schwannomas presented as intraconal masses that mimicked a cavernous hemangioma, a superior orbital mass transgressing the superior orbital fissure, and an expansive frontal lobe mass with clinical symptoms and signs of increased intracranial pressure. Although all three complained of visual blurring, none of our patients presented with Vth or VIIIth cranial nerve dysfunction. Histopathologic studies demonstrated well-circumscribed, encapsulated spindle-cell lesions with classic Antoni A and B patterns. Histopathologic examination is essential to confirm the diagnosis of a schwannoma that may be otherwise clinically confusing. Direct optic nerve compression, globe indentation with induced hyperopia, or increased intracranial pressure with optic nerve compromise may be responsible for visual symptoms. A multidisciplinary approach is often required because of the size and location of schwannomas. Copyright (C) 1999 Elsevier Science Inc.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)226-234
Number of pages9
JournalSurvey of Ophthalmology
Volume44
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1999
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Neurilemmoma
Intracranial Pressure
Optic Nerve
Eye Manifestations
Vestibulocochlear Nerve
Hyperopia
Cavernous Hemangioma
Trigeminal Nerve
Cranial Nerves
Schwann Cells
Peripheral Nervous System
Frontal Lobe
Signs and Symptoms
Neoplasms

Keywords

  • Neurilemoma
  • Schwannoma
  • Tumor

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ophthalmology

Cite this

Cockerham, K. P., Cockerham, G. C., Stutzman, R., Hidayat, A. A., Depper, M. H., Turbin, R. E., & Kennerdell, J. S. (1999). The clinical spectrum of schwannomas presenting with visual dysfunction: A clinicopathologic study of three cases. Survey of Ophthalmology, 44(3), 226-234. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0039-6257(99)00100-9

The clinical spectrum of schwannomas presenting with visual dysfunction : A clinicopathologic study of three cases. / Cockerham, Kimberly Peele; Cockerham, Glenn C.; Stutzman, Richard; Hidayat, Ahmed A.; Depper, Mark H.; Turbin, Roger E.; Kennerdell, John S.

In: Survey of Ophthalmology, Vol. 44, No. 3, 01.01.1999, p. 226-234.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Cockerham, Kimberly Peele ; Cockerham, Glenn C. ; Stutzman, Richard ; Hidayat, Ahmed A. ; Depper, Mark H. ; Turbin, Roger E. ; Kennerdell, John S. / The clinical spectrum of schwannomas presenting with visual dysfunction : A clinicopathologic study of three cases. In: Survey of Ophthalmology. 1999 ; Vol. 44, No. 3. pp. 226-234.
@article{dd9987202c7440e2bc5945d0d6696e0a,
title = "The clinical spectrum of schwannomas presenting with visual dysfunction: A clinicopathologic study of three cases",
abstract = "Schwannomas (neurilemomas) are benign tumors that arise from Schwann cells in the peripheral nervous system. The most commonly involved nerves that cause neuro-ophthalmic manifestations are cranial nerves V and VIII. In this series of three women, schwannomas presented as intraconal masses that mimicked a cavernous hemangioma, a superior orbital mass transgressing the superior orbital fissure, and an expansive frontal lobe mass with clinical symptoms and signs of increased intracranial pressure. Although all three complained of visual blurring, none of our patients presented with Vth or VIIIth cranial nerve dysfunction. Histopathologic studies demonstrated well-circumscribed, encapsulated spindle-cell lesions with classic Antoni A and B patterns. Histopathologic examination is essential to confirm the diagnosis of a schwannoma that may be otherwise clinically confusing. Direct optic nerve compression, globe indentation with induced hyperopia, or increased intracranial pressure with optic nerve compromise may be responsible for visual symptoms. A multidisciplinary approach is often required because of the size and location of schwannomas. Copyright (C) 1999 Elsevier Science Inc.",
keywords = "Neurilemoma, Schwannoma, Tumor",
author = "Cockerham, {Kimberly Peele} and Cockerham, {Glenn C.} and Richard Stutzman and Hidayat, {Ahmed A.} and Depper, {Mark H.} and Turbin, {Roger E.} and Kennerdell, {John S.}",
year = "1999",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/S0039-6257(99)00100-9",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "44",
pages = "226--234",
journal = "Survey of Ophthalmology",
issn = "0039-6257",
publisher = "Elsevier USA",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - The clinical spectrum of schwannomas presenting with visual dysfunction

T2 - A clinicopathologic study of three cases

AU - Cockerham, Kimberly Peele

AU - Cockerham, Glenn C.

AU - Stutzman, Richard

AU - Hidayat, Ahmed A.

AU - Depper, Mark H.

AU - Turbin, Roger E.

AU - Kennerdell, John S.

PY - 1999/1/1

Y1 - 1999/1/1

N2 - Schwannomas (neurilemomas) are benign tumors that arise from Schwann cells in the peripheral nervous system. The most commonly involved nerves that cause neuro-ophthalmic manifestations are cranial nerves V and VIII. In this series of three women, schwannomas presented as intraconal masses that mimicked a cavernous hemangioma, a superior orbital mass transgressing the superior orbital fissure, and an expansive frontal lobe mass with clinical symptoms and signs of increased intracranial pressure. Although all three complained of visual blurring, none of our patients presented with Vth or VIIIth cranial nerve dysfunction. Histopathologic studies demonstrated well-circumscribed, encapsulated spindle-cell lesions with classic Antoni A and B patterns. Histopathologic examination is essential to confirm the diagnosis of a schwannoma that may be otherwise clinically confusing. Direct optic nerve compression, globe indentation with induced hyperopia, or increased intracranial pressure with optic nerve compromise may be responsible for visual symptoms. A multidisciplinary approach is often required because of the size and location of schwannomas. Copyright (C) 1999 Elsevier Science Inc.

AB - Schwannomas (neurilemomas) are benign tumors that arise from Schwann cells in the peripheral nervous system. The most commonly involved nerves that cause neuro-ophthalmic manifestations are cranial nerves V and VIII. In this series of three women, schwannomas presented as intraconal masses that mimicked a cavernous hemangioma, a superior orbital mass transgressing the superior orbital fissure, and an expansive frontal lobe mass with clinical symptoms and signs of increased intracranial pressure. Although all three complained of visual blurring, none of our patients presented with Vth or VIIIth cranial nerve dysfunction. Histopathologic studies demonstrated well-circumscribed, encapsulated spindle-cell lesions with classic Antoni A and B patterns. Histopathologic examination is essential to confirm the diagnosis of a schwannoma that may be otherwise clinically confusing. Direct optic nerve compression, globe indentation with induced hyperopia, or increased intracranial pressure with optic nerve compromise may be responsible for visual symptoms. A multidisciplinary approach is often required because of the size and location of schwannomas. Copyright (C) 1999 Elsevier Science Inc.

KW - Neurilemoma

KW - Schwannoma

KW - Tumor

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0032724288&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0032724288&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/S0039-6257(99)00100-9

DO - 10.1016/S0039-6257(99)00100-9

M3 - Review article

VL - 44

SP - 226

EP - 234

JO - Survey of Ophthalmology

JF - Survey of Ophthalmology

SN - 0039-6257

IS - 3

ER -