The case for primary salivary rhabdomyosarcoma

Mathew Geltzeiler, Guangheng Li, Jinu Abraham, Charles Keller

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Rhabdomyosarcomas of the parotid and submandibular glands have the histological appearance of a skeletal muscle tumor yet can be found in tissue with no striated muscular elements. We examine the potential cell-of-origin for rhabdomyosarcoma and whether salivary tumors represent primary malignancy or metastasis. We have previously established genetically engineered mouse models of rhabdomyosarcoma. In these mice, rhabdomyosarcoma is only induced when a Pax3:Foxo1 fusion oncogene is activated with concurrent loss of p53 function (for alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma) or loss of p53 function alone (for embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma) using Cre-lox technology. These mutations are only activated under the control of promoters specific for selected cell lineages, previously thought to be myogenesis-restricted. RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry for lineage-specific promoter gene products reveal these promoters are active in wild-type mouse salivary gland. Given that mouse rhabdomyosarcoma frequently originates in the salivary glands and these myogenic-related promoters are normally expressed in salivary tissue, a high likelihood exists that the salivary gland contains a cell-of-origin of this muscle-related cancer.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number74
JournalFrontiers in Oncology
Volume5
Issue numberAPR
DOIs
StatePublished - 2015

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Rhabdomyosarcoma
Salivary Glands
Oncogene Fusion
Muscle Neoplasms
Alveolar Rhabdomyosarcoma
Embryonal Rhabdomyosarcoma
Neoplasms
Muscle Development
Submandibular Gland
Parotid Gland
Cell Lineage
Skeletal Muscle
Immunohistochemistry
Neoplasm Metastasis
Technology
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Mutation
Genes

Keywords

  • Head and neck oncology
  • Oncogenesis
  • Rhabdomyosarcoma
  • Salivary gland
  • Salivary gland pathology
  • Sarcoma
  • Tumor biology

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cancer Research
  • Oncology

Cite this

Geltzeiler, M., Li, G., Abraham, J., & Keller, C. (2015). The case for primary salivary rhabdomyosarcoma. Frontiers in Oncology, 5(APR), [74]. https://doi.org/10.3389/fonc.2015.00074

The case for primary salivary rhabdomyosarcoma. / Geltzeiler, Mathew; Li, Guangheng; Abraham, Jinu; Keller, Charles.

In: Frontiers in Oncology, Vol. 5, No. APR, 74, 2015.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Geltzeiler, M, Li, G, Abraham, J & Keller, C 2015, 'The case for primary salivary rhabdomyosarcoma', Frontiers in Oncology, vol. 5, no. APR, 74. https://doi.org/10.3389/fonc.2015.00074
Geltzeiler, Mathew ; Li, Guangheng ; Abraham, Jinu ; Keller, Charles. / The case for primary salivary rhabdomyosarcoma. In: Frontiers in Oncology. 2015 ; Vol. 5, No. APR.
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