The Basis of Oncoimmunology

A. Karolina Palucka, Lisa Coussens

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

257 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Cancer heterogeneity, a hallmark enabling clonal survival and therapy resistance, is shaped by active immune responses. Antigen-specific T cells can control cancer, as revealed clinically by immunotherapeutics such as adoptive T-cell transfer and checkpoint blockade. The host immune system is thus a powerful tool that, if better harnessed, could significantly enhance the efficacy of cytotoxic therapy and improve outcomes for cancer sufferers. To realize this vision, however, a number of research frontiers must be tackled. These include developing strategies for neutralizing tumor-promoting inflammation, broadening T-cell repertoires (via vaccination), and elucidating the mechanisms by which immune cells organize tumor microenvironments to regulate T-cell activity. Such efforts will pave the way for identifying new targets for combination therapies that overcome resistance to current treatments and promote long-term cancer control.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1233-1247
Number of pages15
JournalCell
Volume164
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 10 2016

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T-cells
T-Lymphocytes
Tumors
Neoplasms
Active Immunity
Immune system
Tumor Microenvironment
Adoptive Transfer
Therapeutics
Immune System
Antigens
Vaccination
Inflammation
Research

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)

Cite this

The Basis of Oncoimmunology. / Palucka, A. Karolina; Coussens, Lisa.

In: Cell, Vol. 164, No. 6, 10.03.2016, p. 1233-1247.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Palucka, A. Karolina ; Coussens, Lisa. / The Basis of Oncoimmunology. In: Cell. 2016 ; Vol. 164, No. 6. pp. 1233-1247.
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