The association between hospital obstetric volume and perinatal outcomes in California

Jonathan Snowden, Yvonne W. Cheng, Caitlin P. Kontgis, Aaron Caughey

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

32 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: We sought to analyze the association between hospital obstetric volume and perinatal outcomes in California. Study Design: This was a retrospective cohort study of births occurring in California in 2006. Hospitals were divided into 4 obstetric volume categories. Unadjusted rates of neonatal mortality and birth asphyxia were calculated for each category, overall and among term deliveries with birthweight >2500 g. Multivariable logistic regression was used to control for confounders. Deliveries in rural hospitals were analyzed separately using different volume categories. Results: Prevalence of asphyxia increased with decreasing hospital volume overall and among term, non-low-birthweight infants, from 9/10,000 live births at highest-volume hospitals to 18/10,000 live births at the lowest-volume hospitals (P

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalAmerican Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology
Volume207
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2012

Fingerprint

Obstetrics
Asphyxia
Live Birth
Low-Volume Hospitals
High-Volume Hospitals
Rural Hospitals
Birth Rate
Infant Mortality
Cohort Studies
Retrospective Studies
Logistic Models
Parturition

Keywords

  • asphyxia
  • health care systems
  • health facility size
  • neonatal mortality

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

Cite this

The association between hospital obstetric volume and perinatal outcomes in California. / Snowden, Jonathan; Cheng, Yvonne W.; Kontgis, Caitlin P.; Caughey, Aaron.

In: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Vol. 207, No. 6, 12.2012.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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