The association between body mass index and gestational diabetes mellitus varies by race/ethnicity

Amy Shah, Naomi E. Stotland, Yvonne W. Cheng, Gladys A. Ramos, Aaron B. Caughey

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

26 Scopus citations

Abstract

We examined body mass index (BMI) as a screening tool for gestational diabetes (GDM) and its sensitivity among different racial/ethnic groups. In a retrospective cohort study of 24,324 pregnant women at University of California, San Francisco, BMI was explored as a screening tool for GDM and was stratified by race/ethnicity. Sensitivity and specificity were examined using chi-square test and receiver-operator characteristic curves. BMI of ≥ 25.0 kg/m 2 as a screening threshold identified GDM in >76% of African-Americans, 58% of Latinas, and 46% of Caucasians, but only 25% of Asians (p<0.001). Controlling for confounders and comparing to a BMI of ≤ 25, African-Americans had the greatest increased risk of GDM (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] 5.1, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 3.0 to 8.5), followed by Caucasians (AOR 3.6, 95% CI: 2.7 to 4.8), Latinas (AOR 2.7, 95% CI: 1.9 to 3.8), and Asians (AOR 2.3, 95% CI: 1.8 to 3.0). BMI's screening characteristics to predict GDM varied by race/ethnicity. BMI can be used to counsel regarding the risk of developing GDM, but alone it is not a good screening tool.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)515-520
Number of pages6
JournalAmerican journal of perinatology
Volume28
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 15 2011

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Keywords

  • Body mass index
  • gestational diabetes mellitus
  • glucose loading test
  • race/ethnicity
  • receiver-operator characteristic curve

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

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