The accuracy benefit of multiple amperometric glucose sensors in people with type 1 diabetes

Jessica Castle, Amy Pitts, Kathryn Hanavan, Rhonda Muhly, Joseph El Youssef, Colleen Hughes-Karvetski, Boris Kovatchev, W. Kenneth Ward

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

30 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

OBJECTIVE - To improve glucose sensor accuracy in subjects with type 1 diabetes by using multiple sensors and to assess whether the benefit of redundancy is affected by intersensor distance. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS - Nineteen adults with type 1 diabetes wore four Dexcom SEVEN PLUS subcutaneous glucose sensors during two 9-h studies. One pair of sensors was worn on each side of the abdomen, with each sensor pair placed at a predetermined distance apart and 20 cm away from the opposite pair. Arterialized venous blood glucose levels were measured every 15 min, and sensor glucose values were recorded every 5 min. Sensors were calibrated once at the beginning of the study. RESULTS - The use of four sensors significantly reduced very large errors compared with one sensor (0.4 vs. 2.6% of errors ≥50% from reference glucose, P <0.001) and also improved overall accuracy (mean absolute relative difference, 11.6 vs. 14.8%, P <0.001). Using only two sensors also significantly improved very large errors and accuracy. Intersensor distance did not affect the function of sensor pairs. CONCLUSIONS - Sensor accuracy is significantly improved with the use of multiple sensors compared with the use of a single sensor. The benefit of redundancy is present even when sensors are positioned very closely together (7 mm). These findings are relevant to the design of an artificial pancreas device.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)706-710
Number of pages5
JournalDiabetes Care
Volume35
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2012

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Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus
Glucose
Artificial Pancreas
Abdomen
Blood Glucose
Research Design
Equipment and Supplies

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Advanced and Specialized Nursing

Cite this

The accuracy benefit of multiple amperometric glucose sensors in people with type 1 diabetes. / Castle, Jessica; Pitts, Amy; Hanavan, Kathryn; Muhly, Rhonda; El Youssef, Joseph; Hughes-Karvetski, Colleen; Kovatchev, Boris; Ward, W. Kenneth.

In: Diabetes Care, Vol. 35, No. 4, 04.2012, p. 706-710.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Castle, J, Pitts, A, Hanavan, K, Muhly, R, El Youssef, J, Hughes-Karvetski, C, Kovatchev, B & Ward, WK 2012, 'The accuracy benefit of multiple amperometric glucose sensors in people with type 1 diabetes', Diabetes Care, vol. 35, no. 4, pp. 706-710. https://doi.org/10.2337/dc11-1929
Castle, Jessica ; Pitts, Amy ; Hanavan, Kathryn ; Muhly, Rhonda ; El Youssef, Joseph ; Hughes-Karvetski, Colleen ; Kovatchev, Boris ; Ward, W. Kenneth. / The accuracy benefit of multiple amperometric glucose sensors in people with type 1 diabetes. In: Diabetes Care. 2012 ; Vol. 35, No. 4. pp. 706-710.
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