Texting Adolescents in Repeat DKA and Their Caregivers

David V. Wagner, Samantha Barry, Lena Teplitsky, Annan Sheffield, Maggie Stoeckel, Jimmie D. Ogden, Elizabeth Karkula, Alexandra Hartman, Danny Duke, Kim Spiro, Michael Harris

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Text message interventions are feasible, preferable, and sometimes effective for youth with diabetes. However, few, if any studies, have examined the personalized use of text messages with youth repeatedly hospitalized for diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) and their caregivers. This study characterizes the use of personalized text messages in Novel Interventions in Children's Healthcare (NICH). Methods: Approximately 2 months of text messages sent to youth with repeat DKA and their caregivers were logged regarding the following text characteristics: (1) content, (2) intervention type, (3) timing, and (4) recipient characteristics. Results: NICH interventionists sent 2.3 and 1.5 texts per day to patients and caregivers, respectively. Approximately 59% of outgoing texts occurred outside of typical business hours, and roughly 68% of texts contained some form of support and/or encouragement. The relation between type of intended intervention and day/time of text was significant, χ2(2, N = 5,808) = 266.93, P <.001. Interventionists were more likely to send behavioral intervention text messages outside of business hours, whereas they were more likely to send care coordination and case management text messages during business hours. Conclusions: To our knowledge, this is the first study to specifically categorize and describe the personalized use of text messages with youth repeatedly hospitalized for DKA and their caregivers. Findings indicate that a promising treatment program for these youth frequently used text interventions to deliver praise and encouragement to patients and caregivers alike, often outside of typical business hours, and tailored text content based on patient and caregiver characteristics.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)831-839
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of diabetes science and technology
Volume10
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2016

Fingerprint

Text Messaging
Diabetic Ketoacidosis
Caregivers
Industry
Medical problems
Delivery of Health Care
Case Management

Keywords

  • adolescence
  • mHealth
  • NICH
  • SMS
  • text message
  • type 1 diabetes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Bioengineering
  • Medicine(all)
  • Biomedical Engineering

Cite this

Wagner, D. V., Barry, S., Teplitsky, L., Sheffield, A., Stoeckel, M., Ogden, J. D., ... Harris, M. (2016). Texting Adolescents in Repeat DKA and Their Caregivers. Journal of diabetes science and technology, 10(4), 831-839. https://doi.org/10.1177/1932296816639610

Texting Adolescents in Repeat DKA and Their Caregivers. / Wagner, David V.; Barry, Samantha; Teplitsky, Lena; Sheffield, Annan; Stoeckel, Maggie; Ogden, Jimmie D.; Karkula, Elizabeth; Hartman, Alexandra; Duke, Danny; Spiro, Kim; Harris, Michael.

In: Journal of diabetes science and technology, Vol. 10, No. 4, 01.07.2016, p. 831-839.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Wagner, DV, Barry, S, Teplitsky, L, Sheffield, A, Stoeckel, M, Ogden, JD, Karkula, E, Hartman, A, Duke, D, Spiro, K & Harris, M 2016, 'Texting Adolescents in Repeat DKA and Their Caregivers', Journal of diabetes science and technology, vol. 10, no. 4, pp. 831-839. https://doi.org/10.1177/1932296816639610
Wagner DV, Barry S, Teplitsky L, Sheffield A, Stoeckel M, Ogden JD et al. Texting Adolescents in Repeat DKA and Their Caregivers. Journal of diabetes science and technology. 2016 Jul 1;10(4):831-839. https://doi.org/10.1177/1932296816639610
Wagner, David V. ; Barry, Samantha ; Teplitsky, Lena ; Sheffield, Annan ; Stoeckel, Maggie ; Ogden, Jimmie D. ; Karkula, Elizabeth ; Hartman, Alexandra ; Duke, Danny ; Spiro, Kim ; Harris, Michael. / Texting Adolescents in Repeat DKA and Their Caregivers. In: Journal of diabetes science and technology. 2016 ; Vol. 10, No. 4. pp. 831-839.
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