Testosterone increases circulating dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate levels in the male rhesus macaque

Krystina G. Sorwell, Steven Kohama, Henryk Urbanski

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    8 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    The adrenal steroid dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and its sulfate (DHEAS) are two of the most abundant hormones in the human circulation. Furthermore, they are released in a circadian pattern and show a marked age-associated decline. Adult levels of DHEA and DHEAS are significantly higher in males than in females, but the reason for this sexual dimorphism is unclear. In the present study, we administered supplementary androgens [DHEA, testosterone and 5α-dihydrotestosterone (DHT)] to aged male rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta). While this paradigm increased circulating DHEAS immediately after DHEA administration, an increase was also observed following either testosterone or DHT administration, resulting in hormonal profiles resembling levels observed in young males in terms of both amplitude and circadian pattern. This stimulatory effect was limited to DHEAS, as an increase in circulating cortisol was not observed. Taken together, these data demonstrate an influence of the hypothalamo-pituitary-testicular axis on adrenal function in males, possibly by sensitizing the zona reticularis to the stimulating action of adrenocorticopic hormone. This represents a plausible mechanism to explain sex differences in circulating DHEA and DHEAS levels, and may have important implications in the development of hormone therapies designed for elderly men and women.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Article numberArticle 101
    JournalFrontiers in Endocrinology
    Volume5
    Issue numberJUN
    DOIs
    StatePublished - 2014

    Fingerprint

    Dehydroepiandrosterone Sulfate
    Macaca mulatta
    Dehydroepiandrosterone
    Testosterone
    Dihydrotestosterone
    Hormones
    Sex Characteristics
    Zona Reticularis
    Androgens
    Hydrocortisone
    Steroids

    Keywords

    • Adrenal gland
    • Aging
    • Androgen
    • Dehydroepiandrosterone
    • Non-human primate
    • Testoster

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism

    Cite this

    Testosterone increases circulating dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate levels in the male rhesus macaque. / Sorwell, Krystina G.; Kohama, Steven; Urbanski, Henryk.

    In: Frontiers in Endocrinology, Vol. 5, No. JUN, Article 101, 2014.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    @article{8421c2a9431d4e789b01f79b8a13ec34,
    title = "Testosterone increases circulating dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate levels in the male rhesus macaque",
    abstract = "The adrenal steroid dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and its sulfate (DHEAS) are two of the most abundant hormones in the human circulation. Furthermore, they are released in a circadian pattern and show a marked age-associated decline. Adult levels of DHEA and DHEAS are significantly higher in males than in females, but the reason for this sexual dimorphism is unclear. In the present study, we administered supplementary androgens [DHEA, testosterone and 5α-dihydrotestosterone (DHT)] to aged male rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta). While this paradigm increased circulating DHEAS immediately after DHEA administration, an increase was also observed following either testosterone or DHT administration, resulting in hormonal profiles resembling levels observed in young males in terms of both amplitude and circadian pattern. This stimulatory effect was limited to DHEAS, as an increase in circulating cortisol was not observed. Taken together, these data demonstrate an influence of the hypothalamo-pituitary-testicular axis on adrenal function in males, possibly by sensitizing the zona reticularis to the stimulating action of adrenocorticopic hormone. This represents a plausible mechanism to explain sex differences in circulating DHEA and DHEAS levels, and may have important implications in the development of hormone therapies designed for elderly men and women.",
    keywords = "Adrenal gland, Aging, Androgen, Dehydroepiandrosterone, Non-human primate, Testoster",
    author = "Sorwell, {Krystina G.} and Steven Kohama and Henryk Urbanski",
    year = "2014",
    doi = "10.3389/fendo.2014.00101",
    language = "English (US)",
    volume = "5",
    journal = "Frontiers in Endocrinology",
    issn = "1664-2392",
    publisher = "Frontiers Media S. A.",
    number = "JUN",

    }

    TY - JOUR

    T1 - Testosterone increases circulating dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate levels in the male rhesus macaque

    AU - Sorwell, Krystina G.

    AU - Kohama, Steven

    AU - Urbanski, Henryk

    PY - 2014

    Y1 - 2014

    N2 - The adrenal steroid dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and its sulfate (DHEAS) are two of the most abundant hormones in the human circulation. Furthermore, they are released in a circadian pattern and show a marked age-associated decline. Adult levels of DHEA and DHEAS are significantly higher in males than in females, but the reason for this sexual dimorphism is unclear. In the present study, we administered supplementary androgens [DHEA, testosterone and 5α-dihydrotestosterone (DHT)] to aged male rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta). While this paradigm increased circulating DHEAS immediately after DHEA administration, an increase was also observed following either testosterone or DHT administration, resulting in hormonal profiles resembling levels observed in young males in terms of both amplitude and circadian pattern. This stimulatory effect was limited to DHEAS, as an increase in circulating cortisol was not observed. Taken together, these data demonstrate an influence of the hypothalamo-pituitary-testicular axis on adrenal function in males, possibly by sensitizing the zona reticularis to the stimulating action of adrenocorticopic hormone. This represents a plausible mechanism to explain sex differences in circulating DHEA and DHEAS levels, and may have important implications in the development of hormone therapies designed for elderly men and women.

    AB - The adrenal steroid dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and its sulfate (DHEAS) are two of the most abundant hormones in the human circulation. Furthermore, they are released in a circadian pattern and show a marked age-associated decline. Adult levels of DHEA and DHEAS are significantly higher in males than in females, but the reason for this sexual dimorphism is unclear. In the present study, we administered supplementary androgens [DHEA, testosterone and 5α-dihydrotestosterone (DHT)] to aged male rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta). While this paradigm increased circulating DHEAS immediately after DHEA administration, an increase was also observed following either testosterone or DHT administration, resulting in hormonal profiles resembling levels observed in young males in terms of both amplitude and circadian pattern. This stimulatory effect was limited to DHEAS, as an increase in circulating cortisol was not observed. Taken together, these data demonstrate an influence of the hypothalamo-pituitary-testicular axis on adrenal function in males, possibly by sensitizing the zona reticularis to the stimulating action of adrenocorticopic hormone. This represents a plausible mechanism to explain sex differences in circulating DHEA and DHEAS levels, and may have important implications in the development of hormone therapies designed for elderly men and women.

    KW - Adrenal gland

    KW - Aging

    KW - Androgen

    KW - Dehydroepiandrosterone

    KW - Non-human primate

    KW - Testoster

    UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84905380920&partnerID=8YFLogxK

    UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84905380920&partnerID=8YFLogxK

    U2 - 10.3389/fendo.2014.00101

    DO - 10.3389/fendo.2014.00101

    M3 - Article

    AN - SCOPUS:84905380920

    VL - 5

    JO - Frontiers in Endocrinology

    JF - Frontiers in Endocrinology

    SN - 1664-2392

    IS - JUN

    M1 - Article 101

    ER -