Tele-Interpersonal Psychotherapy Acutely Reduces Depressive Symptoms in Depressed HIV-Infected Rural Persons

A Randomized Clinical Trial

Timothy G. Heckman, Bernadette D. Heckman, Timothy Anderson, Travis Lovejoy, John C. Markowitz, Ye Shen, Mark Sutton

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive rural individuals carry a 1.3-times greater risk of a depressive diagnosis than their urban counterparts. This randomized clinical trial tested whether telephone-administered interpersonal psychotherapy (tele-IPT) acutely relieved depressive symptoms in 132 HIV-infected rural persons from 28 states diagnosed with Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-IV major depressive disorder (MDD), partially remitted MDD, or dysthymic disorder. Patients were randomized to either 9 sessions of one-on-one tele-IPT (n = 70) or standard care (SC; n = 62). A series of intent-to-treat (ITT), therapy completer, and sensitivity analyses assessed changes in depressive symptoms, interpersonal problems, and social support from pre- to postintervention. Across all analyses, tele-IPT patients reported significantly lower depressive symptoms and interpersonal problems than SC controls; 22% of tele-IPT patients were categorized as a priori “responders” who reported 50% or higher reductions in depressive symptoms compared to only 4% of SC controls in ITT analyses. Brief tele-IPT acutely decreased depressive symptoms and interpersonal problems in depressed rural people living with HIV.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)285-295
Number of pages11
JournalBehavioral Medicine
Volume43
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2 2017

Fingerprint

Telephone
Psychotherapy
Randomized Controlled Trials
HIV
Depression
Major Depressive Disorder
Dysthymic Disorder
Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders
Social Support
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • depression
  • HIV
  • IPT
  • rural
  • teletherapy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Applied Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Tele-Interpersonal Psychotherapy Acutely Reduces Depressive Symptoms in Depressed HIV-Infected Rural Persons : A Randomized Clinical Trial. / Heckman, Timothy G.; Heckman, Bernadette D.; Anderson, Timothy; Lovejoy, Travis; Markowitz, John C.; Shen, Ye; Sutton, Mark.

In: Behavioral Medicine, Vol. 43, No. 4, 02.10.2017, p. 285-295.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Heckman, Timothy G. ; Heckman, Bernadette D. ; Anderson, Timothy ; Lovejoy, Travis ; Markowitz, John C. ; Shen, Ye ; Sutton, Mark. / Tele-Interpersonal Psychotherapy Acutely Reduces Depressive Symptoms in Depressed HIV-Infected Rural Persons : A Randomized Clinical Trial. In: Behavioral Medicine. 2017 ; Vol. 43, No. 4. pp. 285-295.
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