Team training in family medicine residency programs and its impact on team-based practice post-graduation

Patricia (Patty) Carney, Elaine Waller, Eve Dexter, Miguel Marino, Kelly Morton, Larry Green, Colleen T. Fogarty, Samuel Jones, M (Patrice) Eiff

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: Our objective was to examine perceptions of adequacy in team-based care training during residency and whether this influences practice choice post- residency training. METHODS: We analyzed self-administered survey data from recent residency graduates collected as part of the Preparing Personal Physicians for Practice (P4) Project to characterize residents’ perceptions of adequacy of training they received on team-based care. Multivariable logistic regression was used to assess the association between adequacy of team-based care training and joining practices that use team-based care after residency graduation, adjusting for differences in demographics. RESULTS: A total of 241 residency graduates were included in these analyses with response rates to surveys of 80.8%–98.1%. They reported practicing in 31 different US states or districts and four other countries. Over 82% of residency graduates reported being adequately trained in team-based care, 9.5% reported being overtrained, and 7.9% reported receiving no team-based care training over the study period. Seventy-six percent of P4 graduates joined practices that used team-based care in 2011, which increased to 86% (81/94) in 2013. The adjusted odds of practicing in settings with team-based care was 5.7 times higher for residents who reported being adequately prepared for team-based care compared to those who reported receiving no team-based care training and was 12.5 times higher for those who reported being over-prepared compared to those who reported no training/under-prepared. CONCLUSIONS: The majority of residency graduates perceive they were well trained in team-based care, which is significantly associated with joining practices that use team-based care post graduation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)346-352
Number of pages7
JournalFamily Medicine
Volume49
Issue number5
StatePublished - May 1 2017

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Family Practice

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