Team mentoring for interdisciplinary team science: Lessons from k12 scholars and directors

Jeanne Marie Guise, Stacie Geller, Judith G. Regensteiner, Nancy Raymond, Joan Nagel

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Scopus citations

Abstract

Purpose Mentoring is critical for academic success. As science transitions to a team science model, team mentoring may have advantages. The goal of this study was to understand the process, benefits, and challenges of team mentoring relating to career development and research. Method A national survey was conducted of Building Interdisciplinary Research Careers in Women's Health (BIRCWH) program directors - current and former scholars from 27 active National Institutes of Health (NIH)-funded BIRCWH NIH K12 programs - to characterize and understand the value and challenges of the team approach to mentoring. Quantitative data were analyzed descriptively, and qualitative data were analyzed thematically. Results Responses were received from 25/27 (93%) program directors, 78/108 (72%) current scholars, and 91/162 (56%) former scholars. Scholars reported that team mentoring was beneficial to their career development (152/169; 90%) and research (148/169; 88%). Reported advantages included a diversity of opinions, expanded networking, development of stronger study designs, and modeling of different career paths. Challenges included scheduling and managing conflicting opinions. Advice by directors offered to junior faculty entering team mentoring included the following: not to be intimidated by senior mentors, be willing to navigate conflicting advice, be proactive about scheduling and guiding discussions, have an open mind to different approaches, be explicit about expectations and mentors' roles (including importance of having a primary mentor to help navigate discussions), and meet in person as a team. Conclusions These findings suggest that interdisciplinary/interprofessional team mentoring has many important advantages, but that skills are required to optimally utilize multiple perspectives.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)214-221
Number of pages8
JournalAcademic Medicine
Volume92
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2017

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education

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