T cells with encephalitogenic potential from multiple sclerosis patients and Lewis rats fail to induce disease in SCID mice following intracisternal injection

Richard E. Jones, Yuan Chou, Amy Young, Michele Mass, Arthur Vandenbark, Halina Offner, Dennis Bourdette

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Intracisternal (IC) transfer of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) mononuclear cells from multiple sclerosis (MS) patients has been reported by others to induce an 'MS-like pathology' in severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice. We injected cells from several sources intracisternally into SCID mice and assessed the recipients for clinical and histological disease. CSF cells and myelin basic protein (BP)-specific T lymphocytes from MS patients failed to induce clinical or histological disease following IC injection in SCID mice. Similarly, encephalitogenic BP-specific T cells from Lewis rats were unable to induce disease after IC injection in either SCID mice or Lewis rats, even at cell numbers which induced experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis in Lewis rats following intraperitoneal (IP) injection. In contrast, naive Lewis rat splenocytes, which were capable of inducing lethal graft-versus-host (GVH) disease following IP transfer in SCID mice, induced paralysis and histopathological changes following IC transfer in SCID mice. We conclude that MS CSF cells do not typically transfer disease into SCID mice following IC injection. Furthermore, it appears likely that neuropathological disease following IC transfer of cells reflects the potential of the transferred cells for inducing GVH disease. Specific recognition of neuroantigens by T cells, as occurs in EAE, is probably not involved in the transfer of paralytic disease by IC transferred MS patient CSF cells.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)119-126
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Neuroimmunology
Volume56
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 1995

Fingerprint

SCID Mice
Multiple Sclerosis
T-Lymphocytes
Injections
Cerebrospinal Fluid
Graft vs Host Disease
Myelin Basic Protein
Autoimmune Experimental Encephalomyelitis
Intraperitoneal Injections
Paralysis
Cell Count
Pathology

Keywords

  • Cisterna magna
  • Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis
  • Local transfer
  • Multiple sclerosis
  • Passive immunization
  • Severe combined immunodeficient mice

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology
  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Neurology

Cite this

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title = "T cells with encephalitogenic potential from multiple sclerosis patients and Lewis rats fail to induce disease in SCID mice following intracisternal injection",
abstract = "Intracisternal (IC) transfer of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) mononuclear cells from multiple sclerosis (MS) patients has been reported by others to induce an 'MS-like pathology' in severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice. We injected cells from several sources intracisternally into SCID mice and assessed the recipients for clinical and histological disease. CSF cells and myelin basic protein (BP)-specific T lymphocytes from MS patients failed to induce clinical or histological disease following IC injection in SCID mice. Similarly, encephalitogenic BP-specific T cells from Lewis rats were unable to induce disease after IC injection in either SCID mice or Lewis rats, even at cell numbers which induced experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis in Lewis rats following intraperitoneal (IP) injection. In contrast, naive Lewis rat splenocytes, which were capable of inducing lethal graft-versus-host (GVH) disease following IP transfer in SCID mice, induced paralysis and histopathological changes following IC transfer in SCID mice. We conclude that MS CSF cells do not typically transfer disease into SCID mice following IC injection. Furthermore, it appears likely that neuropathological disease following IC transfer of cells reflects the potential of the transferred cells for inducing GVH disease. Specific recognition of neuroantigens by T cells, as occurs in EAE, is probably not involved in the transfer of paralytic disease by IC transferred MS patient CSF cells.",
keywords = "Cisterna magna, Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, Local transfer, Multiple sclerosis, Passive immunization, Severe combined immunodeficient mice",
author = "Jones, {Richard E.} and Yuan Chou and Amy Young and Michele Mass and Arthur Vandenbark and Halina Offner and Dennis Bourdette",
year = "1995",
doi = "10.1016/0165-5728(94)00130-G",
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TY - JOUR

T1 - T cells with encephalitogenic potential from multiple sclerosis patients and Lewis rats fail to induce disease in SCID mice following intracisternal injection

AU - Jones, Richard E.

AU - Chou, Yuan

AU - Young, Amy

AU - Mass, Michele

AU - Vandenbark, Arthur

AU - Offner, Halina

AU - Bourdette, Dennis

PY - 1995

Y1 - 1995

N2 - Intracisternal (IC) transfer of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) mononuclear cells from multiple sclerosis (MS) patients has been reported by others to induce an 'MS-like pathology' in severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice. We injected cells from several sources intracisternally into SCID mice and assessed the recipients for clinical and histological disease. CSF cells and myelin basic protein (BP)-specific T lymphocytes from MS patients failed to induce clinical or histological disease following IC injection in SCID mice. Similarly, encephalitogenic BP-specific T cells from Lewis rats were unable to induce disease after IC injection in either SCID mice or Lewis rats, even at cell numbers which induced experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis in Lewis rats following intraperitoneal (IP) injection. In contrast, naive Lewis rat splenocytes, which were capable of inducing lethal graft-versus-host (GVH) disease following IP transfer in SCID mice, induced paralysis and histopathological changes following IC transfer in SCID mice. We conclude that MS CSF cells do not typically transfer disease into SCID mice following IC injection. Furthermore, it appears likely that neuropathological disease following IC transfer of cells reflects the potential of the transferred cells for inducing GVH disease. Specific recognition of neuroantigens by T cells, as occurs in EAE, is probably not involved in the transfer of paralytic disease by IC transferred MS patient CSF cells.

AB - Intracisternal (IC) transfer of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) mononuclear cells from multiple sclerosis (MS) patients has been reported by others to induce an 'MS-like pathology' in severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice. We injected cells from several sources intracisternally into SCID mice and assessed the recipients for clinical and histological disease. CSF cells and myelin basic protein (BP)-specific T lymphocytes from MS patients failed to induce clinical or histological disease following IC injection in SCID mice. Similarly, encephalitogenic BP-specific T cells from Lewis rats were unable to induce disease after IC injection in either SCID mice or Lewis rats, even at cell numbers which induced experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis in Lewis rats following intraperitoneal (IP) injection. In contrast, naive Lewis rat splenocytes, which were capable of inducing lethal graft-versus-host (GVH) disease following IP transfer in SCID mice, induced paralysis and histopathological changes following IC transfer in SCID mice. We conclude that MS CSF cells do not typically transfer disease into SCID mice following IC injection. Furthermore, it appears likely that neuropathological disease following IC transfer of cells reflects the potential of the transferred cells for inducing GVH disease. Specific recognition of neuroantigens by T cells, as occurs in EAE, is probably not involved in the transfer of paralytic disease by IC transferred MS patient CSF cells.

KW - Cisterna magna

KW - Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis

KW - Local transfer

KW - Multiple sclerosis

KW - Passive immunization

KW - Severe combined immunodeficient mice

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