T cells and viral persistence

Lessons from diverse infections

Paul Klenerman, Ann Hill

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

303 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Persistent virus infections create specific problems for their hosts. Although the dynamics of immune responses after acute infection are well studied and very consistent, especially in mouse models, the patterns of responses noted during persistent infection are more complex and differ depending on the infection. In particular, CD8+ T cell responses differ widely in quantity and quality. In this review we examine these diverse responses and ask how they may arise; in particular, we discuss the function of antigen re-encounter and the CD4+ T cell responses to and the escape strategies of specific viruses. We focus on studies of four main human pathogens, cytomegalovirus, Epstein-Barr virus, human immunodeficiency virus and hepatitis C virus, and their animal models.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)873-879
Number of pages7
JournalNature Immunology
Volume6
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2005

Fingerprint

T-Lymphocytes
Infection
Virus Diseases
Cytomegalovirus
Human Herpesvirus 4
Hepacivirus
Animal Models
HIV
Viruses
Antigens

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology

Cite this

T cells and viral persistence : Lessons from diverse infections. / Klenerman, Paul; Hill, Ann.

In: Nature Immunology, Vol. 6, No. 9, 09.2005, p. 873-879.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{24a678a5a92a47a59a5682bb8c1167f8,
title = "T cells and viral persistence: Lessons from diverse infections",
abstract = "Persistent virus infections create specific problems for their hosts. Although the dynamics of immune responses after acute infection are well studied and very consistent, especially in mouse models, the patterns of responses noted during persistent infection are more complex and differ depending on the infection. In particular, CD8+ T cell responses differ widely in quantity and quality. In this review we examine these diverse responses and ask how they may arise; in particular, we discuss the function of antigen re-encounter and the CD4+ T cell responses to and the escape strategies of specific viruses. We focus on studies of four main human pathogens, cytomegalovirus, Epstein-Barr virus, human immunodeficiency virus and hepatitis C virus, and their animal models.",
author = "Paul Klenerman and Ann Hill",
year = "2005",
month = "9",
doi = "10.1038/ni1241",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "6",
pages = "873--879",
journal = "Nature Immunology",
issn = "1529-2908",
publisher = "Nature Publishing Group",
number = "9",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - T cells and viral persistence

T2 - Lessons from diverse infections

AU - Klenerman, Paul

AU - Hill, Ann

PY - 2005/9

Y1 - 2005/9

N2 - Persistent virus infections create specific problems for their hosts. Although the dynamics of immune responses after acute infection are well studied and very consistent, especially in mouse models, the patterns of responses noted during persistent infection are more complex and differ depending on the infection. In particular, CD8+ T cell responses differ widely in quantity and quality. In this review we examine these diverse responses and ask how they may arise; in particular, we discuss the function of antigen re-encounter and the CD4+ T cell responses to and the escape strategies of specific viruses. We focus on studies of four main human pathogens, cytomegalovirus, Epstein-Barr virus, human immunodeficiency virus and hepatitis C virus, and their animal models.

AB - Persistent virus infections create specific problems for their hosts. Although the dynamics of immune responses after acute infection are well studied and very consistent, especially in mouse models, the patterns of responses noted during persistent infection are more complex and differ depending on the infection. In particular, CD8+ T cell responses differ widely in quantity and quality. In this review we examine these diverse responses and ask how they may arise; in particular, we discuss the function of antigen re-encounter and the CD4+ T cell responses to and the escape strategies of specific viruses. We focus on studies of four main human pathogens, cytomegalovirus, Epstein-Barr virus, human immunodeficiency virus and hepatitis C virus, and their animal models.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=24944509220&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=24944509220&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1038/ni1241

DO - 10.1038/ni1241

M3 - Article

VL - 6

SP - 873

EP - 879

JO - Nature Immunology

JF - Nature Immunology

SN - 1529-2908

IS - 9

ER -