T cell-antigen-presenting cell interactions visualized in vivo in a model of antigen-specific inflammation

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Abstract

Videomicroscopy is being used increasingly to characterize the interaction of T cells and antigen-presenting cells (APCs) within lymphatic tissues but has not been reported, to our knowledge, at sites of inflammation. We employed intravital videomicroscopy to study an anterior uveitis model using DO11.10 T cells and ovalbumin (OVA). T cell movement in iris was consistent with a random walk independent of the presence of recognized antigen and had a lateral speed slower than T cells in lymph node. Lingering of T cells adjacent to APCs suggested that they were physically interacting. This apparent contact demonstrated antigen specificity when comparing results from DO11.10 cells with OVA versus bovine serum albumin (BSA) loaded APCs but not when comparing results from OVA-loaded APCs with DO11.10 versus HA clonotype 6.5 T cells. Further studies with this model system should clarify the contribution of T cell-APC communication at a site of inflammation, infection, or immunization.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)270-276
Number of pages7
JournalClinical Immunology
Volume126
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2008

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Viral Tumor Antigens
Antigen-Presenting Cells
Cell Communication
Inflammation
T-Lymphocytes
Antigens
Ovalbumin
Video Microscopy
Anterior Uveitis
Lymphoid Tissue
Iris
Bovine Serum Albumin
Cell Movement
Immunization
Lymph Nodes
Infection

Keywords

  • Antigen-presenting cells
  • Cell migration
  • Intravital microscopy
  • Mice
  • T cells
  • Uveitis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology
  • Immunology and Allergy

Cite this

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title = "T cell-antigen-presenting cell interactions visualized in vivo in a model of antigen-specific inflammation",
abstract = "Videomicroscopy is being used increasingly to characterize the interaction of T cells and antigen-presenting cells (APCs) within lymphatic tissues but has not been reported, to our knowledge, at sites of inflammation. We employed intravital videomicroscopy to study an anterior uveitis model using DO11.10 T cells and ovalbumin (OVA). T cell movement in iris was consistent with a random walk independent of the presence of recognized antigen and had a lateral speed slower than T cells in lymph node. Lingering of T cells adjacent to APCs suggested that they were physically interacting. This apparent contact demonstrated antigen specificity when comparing results from DO11.10 cells with OVA versus bovine serum albumin (BSA) loaded APCs but not when comparing results from OVA-loaded APCs with DO11.10 versus HA clonotype 6.5 T cells. Further studies with this model system should clarify the contribution of T cell-APC communication at a site of inflammation, infection, or immunization.",
keywords = "Antigen-presenting cells, Cell migration, Intravital microscopy, Mice, T cells, Uveitis",
author = "Rosenbaum, {James (Jim)} and Ronick, {Mischa B.} and Xubo Song and Dongseok Choi and Stephen Planck",
year = "2008",
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T1 - T cell-antigen-presenting cell interactions visualized in vivo in a model of antigen-specific inflammation

AU - Rosenbaum, James (Jim)

AU - Ronick, Mischa B.

AU - Song, Xubo

AU - Choi, Dongseok

AU - Planck, Stephen

PY - 2008/3

Y1 - 2008/3

N2 - Videomicroscopy is being used increasingly to characterize the interaction of T cells and antigen-presenting cells (APCs) within lymphatic tissues but has not been reported, to our knowledge, at sites of inflammation. We employed intravital videomicroscopy to study an anterior uveitis model using DO11.10 T cells and ovalbumin (OVA). T cell movement in iris was consistent with a random walk independent of the presence of recognized antigen and had a lateral speed slower than T cells in lymph node. Lingering of T cells adjacent to APCs suggested that they were physically interacting. This apparent contact demonstrated antigen specificity when comparing results from DO11.10 cells with OVA versus bovine serum albumin (BSA) loaded APCs but not when comparing results from OVA-loaded APCs with DO11.10 versus HA clonotype 6.5 T cells. Further studies with this model system should clarify the contribution of T cell-APC communication at a site of inflammation, infection, or immunization.

AB - Videomicroscopy is being used increasingly to characterize the interaction of T cells and antigen-presenting cells (APCs) within lymphatic tissues but has not been reported, to our knowledge, at sites of inflammation. We employed intravital videomicroscopy to study an anterior uveitis model using DO11.10 T cells and ovalbumin (OVA). T cell movement in iris was consistent with a random walk independent of the presence of recognized antigen and had a lateral speed slower than T cells in lymph node. Lingering of T cells adjacent to APCs suggested that they were physically interacting. This apparent contact demonstrated antigen specificity when comparing results from DO11.10 cells with OVA versus bovine serum albumin (BSA) loaded APCs but not when comparing results from OVA-loaded APCs with DO11.10 versus HA clonotype 6.5 T cells. Further studies with this model system should clarify the contribution of T cell-APC communication at a site of inflammation, infection, or immunization.

KW - Antigen-presenting cells

KW - Cell migration

KW - Intravital microscopy

KW - Mice

KW - T cells

KW - Uveitis

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