Systematic review of the comparative effectiveness of antiepileptic drugs for fibromyalgia

Anne Chamberlin Siler, Hallie Gardner, Keenan Yanit, Tera Cushman, Marian McDonagh

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

23 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Fibromyalgia is a difficult-to-treat chronic pain syndrome that affects 2% of the US population. Pregabalin is an antiepileptic recently FDA approved for fibromyalgia treatment. Other antiepileptics have been suggested for treatment. This systematic review examines the relative benefits and harms of antiepileptic drugs in the treatment of fibromyalgia. A literature search was conducted and 8 studies matched criteria (7 studies of pregabalin, 1 of gabapentin). Both drugs reduced mean pain scores more than placebo at a modest rate (pregabalin, 38% to 50%; gabapentin, 51%). In a 6-month trial of pregabalin responders, 32% continued to have response at 6 months, with a mean time to loss of response of 34 days. Compared to placebo, the drugs had similarly high rates of adverse events and withdrawals. Without a head-to-head trial it is not possible to conclude if 1 antiepileptic is more effective or harmful than the other, although limited evidence suggests potential differences. Future studies must directly compare the drugs, include a more broadly defined population, examine long term benefits and harms, and include cointerventions. We conclude that pregabalin and gabapentin are modestly effective for the treatment of fibromyalgia but that their long-term safety and efficacy remain unknown. Perspective: This systematic review evaluates the benefits and harms of using the antiepileptic drugs gabapentin and pregabalin for the treatment of fibromyalgia. Conclusions from this paper can help clinicians to more effectively treat the pain associated with fibromyalgia.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)407-415
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Pain
Volume12
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2011

Fingerprint

Fibromyalgia
Anticonvulsants
Placebos
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Therapeutics
Pain
Chronic Pain
Population
Pregabalin
Safety
gabapentin

Keywords

  • anticonvulsant
  • antiepileptic
  • fibromyalgia
  • gabapentin
  • pregabalin
  • Review

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine
  • Neurology
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Systematic review of the comparative effectiveness of antiepileptic drugs for fibromyalgia. / Siler, Anne Chamberlin; Gardner, Hallie; Yanit, Keenan; Cushman, Tera; McDonagh, Marian.

In: Journal of Pain, Vol. 12, No. 4, 04.2011, p. 407-415.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Siler, Anne Chamberlin ; Gardner, Hallie ; Yanit, Keenan ; Cushman, Tera ; McDonagh, Marian. / Systematic review of the comparative effectiveness of antiepileptic drugs for fibromyalgia. In: Journal of Pain. 2011 ; Vol. 12, No. 4. pp. 407-415.
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