Sutureless liver repair and hemorrhage control using laser-mediated fusion of human albumin as a solder

Yasmin Wadia, Hua Xie, Michio Kajitani

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Major liver trauma has a high mortality because of immediate exsanguination and a delayed morbidity from septicemia, peritonitis, biliary fistulae, and delayed secondary hemorrhage. We evaluated laser soldering using liquid albumin for welding liver injuries. Methods: Fourteen lacerations (6 × 2 cm) and 13 nonanatomic resection injuries (raw surface, 8 × 2 cm) were repaired. An 805-nm laser was used to weld 53% liquid albumin-indocyanine green solder to the liver surface, reinforcing it by welding a free autologous omental scaffold. The animals were heparinized and hepatic inflow occlusion was used for vascular control. For both laceration and resection injuries, 16 soldering repairs were evaluated acutely at 3 hours. Eleven animals were evaluated chronically, two at 2 weeks and nine at 4 weeks. Results: All 27 laser mediated-liver repairs had minimal blood loss compared with the suture controls. No dehiscence, hemorrhage, or bile leakage was seen in any of the laser repairs after 3 hours. All 11 chronic repairs healed without complication. Conclusion: This modality effectively seals the liver surface, joins lacerations with minimal thermal injury, and works independently of the patient's coagulation status.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)51-59
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Trauma - Injury, Infection and Critical Care
Volume51
Issue number1
StatePublished - Jul 2001

Fingerprint

Albumins
Lasers
Hemorrhage
Lacerations
Liver
Wounds and Injuries
Welding
Biliary Fistula
Exsanguination
Indocyanine Green
Peritonitis
Bile
Sutures
Blood Vessels
Sutureless Surgical Procedures
Sepsis
Hot Temperature
Morbidity
Mortality

Keywords

  • Albumin solder
  • Indocyanine green
  • Liver trauma
  • Tissue welding

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Cite this

Sutureless liver repair and hemorrhage control using laser-mediated fusion of human albumin as a solder. / Wadia, Yasmin; Xie, Hua; Kajitani, Michio.

In: Journal of Trauma - Injury, Infection and Critical Care, Vol. 51, No. 1, 07.2001, p. 51-59.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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