Sustainability and Organizational change: Employees' Perspective on the case of streamline manufacturing

Hilary Bradbury-Huang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This case is based on 30 interviews with participants in a seven-year sustainability project at a leading North American manufacturer. The project enhanced financial value and positively impacted the natural and organizational environments. The case draws attention to innovative methods to increase non-executive employee engagement in technical innovation for sustainability. In particular, many interviewees noted how eco-action learning had motivated them to persevere. However, their intense commitment also exacted a cost, most significantly in time away from family. The process by which these results were achieved is discussed as an example of "appreciative intelligence" to suggest how leaders and employees can reframe business, connect elevated personal purpose to day-to-day business tasks, and consequently create a more sustainable future.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)215-235
Number of pages21
JournalAdvances in Appreciative Inquiry
Volume3
Issue number1
StatePublished - 2010
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

organizational change
manufacturing
sustainability
employee
technical innovation
intelligence
commitment
leader
costs
interview
learning
Values
time

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Sciences(all)
  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Gender Studies

Cite this

Sustainability and Organizational change : Employees' Perspective on the case of streamline manufacturing. / Bradbury-Huang, Hilary.

In: Advances in Appreciative Inquiry, Vol. 3, No. 1, 2010, p. 215-235.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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