Surgical treatment of patients with back problems covered by workers compensation versus those with other sources of payment

Victoria M. Taylor, Richard (Rick) Deyo, Marcia Ciol, William Kreuter

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

32 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Study Design. The present study examines relationships between workers' compensation coverage and the surgical treatment of patients with low back problems. Objectives. To examine the mix of surgical procedures, reoperation rates, and resource use among patients receiving workers' compensation and those with other sources of payment. Summary of Background Data. There is evidence that patients with low back pain who receive workers' compensation have poorer clinical outcomes than other patients with back problems. Methods. The authors used data from Washington State's automated hospital discharge system for 1988 through 1981. The study group included 1502 patients receiving workers' compensation and 2674 patients not receiving workers' compensation. Results. If the patients were covered by workers' compensation, they were 1.37 times more likely to undergo surgery involving fusion (95% confidence interval, 1.04-1.80) and almost twice as likely to have a subsequent reoperation within 3 years of the index surgery (odds ratio, 1.80; 95% confidence interval, 1.50-2.15). Conclusions. In Washington state, patients receiving workers' compensation have higher rates of low back fusion surgery and reoperations than other patients.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2255-2259
Number of pages5
JournalSpine
Volume21
Issue number19
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 1996
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Workers' Compensation
Reoperation
Therapeutics
Confidence Intervals
State Hospitals
Low Back Pain
Odds Ratio

Keywords

  • low back pain
  • surgical management
  • workers' compensation coverage

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine

Cite this

Surgical treatment of patients with back problems covered by workers compensation versus those with other sources of payment. / Taylor, Victoria M.; Deyo, Richard (Rick); Ciol, Marcia; Kreuter, William.

In: Spine, Vol. 21, No. 19, 01.10.1996, p. 2255-2259.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Taylor, Victoria M. ; Deyo, Richard (Rick) ; Ciol, Marcia ; Kreuter, William. / Surgical treatment of patients with back problems covered by workers compensation versus those with other sources of payment. In: Spine. 1996 ; Vol. 21, No. 19. pp. 2255-2259.
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